The Story Performance Handbook

By R. Craig Roney | Go to book overview

1—
Introduction to Reading Aloud

Reading aloud, simply defined, involves the oral sharing of some printed text where the text is in full view of the reader and, in some instances, the audience as well. Without the immediate availability of the printed text, the reader would have a difficult, if not impossible, time remembering it and sharing it effectively with the audience. The type of text is irrelevant; that is, it can be fiction, nonfiction, poetry, newsprint, or any other type of printed material. Typically, however, the art of reading aloud is commonly associated with the sharing of fiction with an audience.


The Value of Reading Aloud

The most obvious use of reading aloud is as a means of entertainment. Occasionally actors or other notable people will read stories or poetry in public performances. However, its most frequent uses are in the home, where parents read stories to young children, and in schools or libraries, where professionals share literature with students and young patrons. Aside from its entertainment value, there is much greater benefit to be derived from adults reading to children. An abundance of research over the past 40 years confirms the educational value of the practice (Galda & Cullinan, 1991; McCormick, 1977; Short, 1995, pp. 75–89, 111–116). Children who are read to frequently in the preschool years come to school with a leg up on literacy development. Initially, the benefit of listening to stories read is that it has a profound influence on their oral language development. A child's pho-

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Story Performance Handbook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Credits ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part I - Reading Aloud 1
  • 1 - Introduction to Reading Aloud 3
  • 2 - Reading Aloud Picture Books 6
  • 3 - Reading Aloud Chapter Books 43
  • 4 - Reading Poetry Aloud 69
  • Part II - Transition to Storytelling 77
  • 5 - Sharing Stories Through the Use of Props 79
  • Part III - Storytelling 111
  • 6 - Introduction to Storytelling 113
  • 7 - Stand-Up Storytelling 118
  • 8 - Telling Your Own Self-Created Tales 141
  • Part IV - Developing Story Performance Programs 157
  • 9 - Creating a Story Performance Program 159
  • References 181
  • Author Index 187
  • Subject Index 191
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 193

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.