Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice

By Owen Hargie; David Dickson | Go to book overview
8.5 Being precise about vagueness 214
9.1 Dimensions of self: two examples 224
9.2 Three 'sides' to place identity 226
9.3 Advantages of counsellor disclosure 239
10.1 Functions of set induction 262
10.2 Handshake variations 267
10.3 Functions of closure 280
10.4 Nonverbal closure indicators 281
10.5 Techniques for circumventing the interrupted closure 285
11.1 Negative and positive assertion 293
11.2 Functions of assertiveness 293
11.3 Elaboration components in assertion statements 310
11.4 Gender differences in language 315
11.5 Individualist and collectivist cultural differences 318
12.1 The six main purposes of persuasion 328
12.2 Reverse psychology methods for overcoming resistance 332
12.3 Negative and positive mood and persuasion 337
12.4 The three Ts of expert power 344
12.5 Advantages of humour in persuasion 348
12.6 Foot-in-the-door conditions 354
12.7 Door-in-the-face conditions 355
12.8 Types of moral appeal 360
12.9 Motivations for volunteerism 364
12.10 Summary of the main persuasion tactics 367
13.1 Functions of negotiation 373
13.2 The seven rules for win-win negotiations 376
13.3 Some variations in negotiations across cultures 381
13.4 Pointers for making concessions 389
14.1 Common types of small group 403
14.2 Advantages of group cohesion 413
14.3 Avoiding groupthink 414
14.4 How to spot a team 417
14.5 Interaction process analysis categories 419

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Skilled Interpersonal Communication: Research, Theory, and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Contents vii
  • Figures viii
  • Boxes ix
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition xi
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction- The Importance of Interpersonal Skills 1
  • Chapter 2 - Interpersonal Communication:A Skill-Based Model 11
  • Chapter 3 - Nonverbal Communication 43
  • Chapter 4 - Rewarding and Reinforcing 81
  • Chapter 5 - Questioning 115
  • Chapter 6 - Reflecting 147
  • Chapter 7 - Listening 169
  • Chapter 8 - Explaining 197
  • Chapter 9 - Self-Disclosure 223
  • Chapter 10 - Set Induction and Closure 259
  • Chapter 1- 1 - Assertiveness 291
  • Chapter 12 - Influence and Persuasion 325
  • Chapter 13 - Negotiating 369
  • Chapter 14 - Groups and Group Interaction 401
  • Chapter 15 - Concluding Comments 439
  • References 443
  • Name Index 509
  • Subject Index 521
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