Citizenship through Secondary History

By James Arthur; Ian Davies et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

The history teacher and global citizenship

Introduction

The concept of global citizenship is attracting increasing attention. Many argue that our perspectives on globalisation determine the way we already respond to key issues. This chapter will explore whether globalisation is actually significant (as opposed merely to attracting increased attention from academics); it will attempt a characterisation of the nature of globalisation, global citizenship and global education. The key debates within global education will be described and some of the potential links with teaching and learning history will be outlined. A number of examples of classroom work will be given prior to a conclusion.


Are ideas about globalisation important?

It is undeniable that since 1990 there have been an increasing number of publications focusing on global trends (e.g. Kennedy 1993; Hertz 2001). Academic centres such as the Centre for the Study of Global Governance at the London School of Economics have been established to increase understanding and knowledge of global problems and to encourage interaction between both international organisations and national governments. Key texts from political science are focused on the global order (e.g. Held 1995) and there is an increasing number of publications relating directly to education within a global framework. A proliferation of international research projects explore teachers' perceptions of citizenship (e.g. Albala-Bertrand 1995; Cogan and Derricott 1998; Angell and Hahn 1996; Hahn 1998; Torney-Purta et al. 1999; Fouts in press). The number of fundamental discussions within an educational context about the nature of citizenship has expanded massively (e.g. Lynch 1992; Torres 1998). Many texts provide support for those involved in teacher education (e.g. Steiner 1996) and for work in classrooms with school students (e.g. Pike and Selby 1988, 1995; Claire 1996; Hill et al. 1998). This is, of course, in addition to - and partly as a result of - the huge interest shown in citizenship in individual states across the globe. High-status action including academic, media and governmental initiatives is taking place in the USA, Australia, the United Kingdom and many other countries. There is little doubt that an international dimension to citizenship education can easily be demonstrated. It seems obvious to suggest that this must be one

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