Housing and Social Change: East-West Perspectives

By Ray Forrest; James Lee | Go to book overview

4

Housing provision and management of aspirations

Chua Beng Huat


Introduction

Social welfarism is now largely a negative concept; unemployment insurance has been substituted with 'workfare' and 'co-payment' by user and state has been instituted in other services, such as healthcare, primary and secondary education and public transportation. However, to the extent that market failures to provide employment, housing, and healthcare for all are inevitable, so too is the fact that there will be a segment of the population that will fall through the market net - some form of welfarism is unavoidable in capitalist market driven economies. This would entail that no capitalist states can reject the idea of welfarism out-of-hand or totally. Nevertheless, there is a tendency for analysts to take a 'fiscal' outlook: due to its drain on the national economy, the state will always maintain provision at the minimal levels, and get out completely if it were possible. For example, in the case of public housing, the trajectory of state provision has been characterized as a four-step process: intervention, provision, quality improvement and withdrawal (Power 1993:3-4). Such a conceptualization fails to explain the Singapore instance, where the long-ruling government espouses 100 per cent home-ownership, overwhelmingly by state provision, through sales of 99-year leasehold high-rise apartments built on state land. Since the mid-1980s, the state housing sector has completed more than 700,000 flats, accommodating 85 per cent of the population of three million, of which more than 85 per cent of the households own their 99-year leasehold flats. The Singapore case suggests that a narrow fiscal view of state provision of any goods is inadequate.

Analytically, state provided goods and services should always be viewed primarily as a 'political' good, while the ability to provide, the fiscal question, is always a contingent issue. As political good, it is analytically crucial that one examines the political pay-offs of provision, of which the most immediate, if not the most obvious, is the ruling government's legitimacy to rule. It would seem to be both logically and substantively the case that a well-implemented program of provision of any goods will accrue to the ruling government political capital, thus

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Housing and Social Change: East-West Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.