Making Sense of Lifelong Learning: Respecting the Needs of All

By Norman Evans | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Writing a book like this towards the end of a long life spent in schools, colleges and universities and, more latterly, in the Learning from Experience Trust concentrating on the border zone between formal and informal learning, inevitably means that whatever is in it stems from experiences, ideas and dreams, stimulated professionally and personally by innumerable colleagues, friends, pupils and students. During the past twenty years regular visits to the USA, and several to South Africa and New Zealand, have added to that store, especially through many in the Chicago-based Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, colleagues who teach continuing education seminars in Cambridge and the New School in New York, and who teach in the School of New Resources, College of New Rochelle and University College, University of Maryland.

However, a few are worthy of special mention. Colin Griffin of Hillcroft College and the University of Surrey has been influential not only for this book but more generally over the years through countless conversations. Malcolm Barry, Director of the College of London, London Metropolitan University, always had penetrating comments to make based on his long experience of running Professional and Community Education at Goldsmiths College. Anne Rumpus, Head of the Educational Initiative Centre in the University of Westminster, invariably had an interesting slant to offer based on her experience of staff development. There are all the people who worked in the Learning from Experience Trust and Patrick Coldstream, formerly Director of the Council for Industry and Higher Education, with whom there have been almost bimonthly evening meetings on the topic. And who could fail to be influenced in this field by Richard Hoggart?

Above all I have been privileged to work closely for twenty years with the late Sir Charles Carter, a wise, incisive Chairman at the Trust until his death in 2002, and my good friend Morris Keeton, Founding President of the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning, who set me off on the experiential learning trail in 1979. With mentors like this, who could ask for more?

-viii-

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Making Sense of Lifelong Learning: Respecting the Needs of All
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Lifelong Learning 5
  • Chapter 3 - Evolving Practice of Lifelong Learning 16
  • Chapter 4 - Catching Up 53
  • Chapter 5 - Motivational Mismatches for Lifelong Learning 69
  • Chapter 6 - Towards Wider Participation 95
  • Chapter 7 - Widening Participation - Doing It 128
  • Chapter 8 - Postscript 156
  • References 160
  • Index 163
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