A Magazine of Her Own? Domesticity and Desire in the Woman's Magazine, 1800-1914

By Margaret Beetham | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book has been a long time in the making and I have often wondered why I embarked upon it at all. In the course of its somewhat tortuous development I have incurred more debts both intellectual and personal than I can fully acknowledge here. Janet Batsleer, Laurel Brake, Elspeth Graham, Lynette Hunter and Linda Walker read chapters and commented on them in ways I found both stimulating and supportive. Helen Beetham discussed the whole with me and suggested cuts and amendments which helped shape the final draft, as well as typing a full bibliographical Appendix, which we were not in the end able to include. Brian Maidment encouraged me with ideas and volumes from his library. Erica Burman helped clarify my thinking on the final chapter. I have been sustained throughout by a network of women colleagues and friends to whom I owe much; thankyou Pat, Janet, Erica, Karen, Joanna, Carole, Peta, Elspeth and Miriam. David Beetham has been a constant enabler and support through the switchback ride of writing this book. To him and to my daughters, Helen and Kate, I can only hope the appearance of the book is some consolation as well as a token of my love and gratitude.

I am grateful also to my department and to its head, Colin Buckley, for a sabbatical term in the summer of 1994, which enabled me to complete the final draft. Thanks to the librarians and keepers of the various places where I did research: Birmingham City Library, the British Library, Colindale, the Brotherton Library of Leeds University, Manchester Central Library and Gallery of English Costume whose keeper allowed me to use their Archive, and above all thanks to staff of my own library at the Manchester Metropolitan University. I have given papers based on the material here at a number of seminars and conferences where discussion has helped me clarify my ideas.

I am grateful to Manchester City Art Gallery for permission to reproduce material from: the Lady's Magazine for 1780, La Belle Assemblée for three advertisements from Queen and material from Home Chat. Thanks also to the Manchester Metropolitan University for permission to use material from the Family Friend, the Englishwoman's Domestic Magazine and Queen.

It is usual to end with a disclaimer and I would not want to accuse any of my friends and colleagues of being responsible for what follows. I am, however, mainly aware of the impossibility of writing anything on one's own-just as I argue that the texts I discuss must always be read in terms of their relationships to each other and to other texts.

-x-

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