Cultural Sniping: The Art of Transgression

By Jo Spence; Jo Stanley et al. | Go to book overview

CULTURAL SNIPING

THE ART OF TRANSGRESSION

by Jo Spence

literary editing by Jo Stanley

picture editing by David Heyey

foreword by Annette Kuhn

London and New york

-3-

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Cultural Sniping: The Art of Transgression
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Illustrations 10
  • Acknowledgements 14
  • Editor's Preface 17
  • Introduction 19
  • Chronology of Jo Spence's Life 24
  • Class, Realism and Beyond 29
  • 1. - The Politics of Photography 31
  • 2. - The Unpolitical Photograph? 37
  • 3. - What Did You Do in the War, Mummy? 43
  • 4. - Project on Identity 48
  • 5. - The Sign as a Site of Class Struggle 51
  • 6. - Thoughts on the Process of Exhibition Selection 59
  • 7. - Fairy Tales and Photography 62
  • 8. - An Omnibus Dossier 69
  • 9. - Remodelling Photo-History 76
  • 10. - Ten Years of Photography Workshop 87
  • 11. - Questioning Documentary Practice? 97
  • Notes to Part One 109
  • A Crisis Risis of Representation Health and Bodies 111
  • 12. - The Picture of Health? 113
  • 13. - Tip of the Iceberg 124
  • 14. - Identity and Cultural Production 129
  • 15. - Body Beautiful or Body in Crisis 137
  • Notes to Part Two 141
  • Identity, Photography, Therapy 143
  • 16. - New Knots, 1983 145
  • 17. - The Politics of Transformation 147
  • 18. - 'Could Do Better'… 156
  • 19. - Phototherapy 164
  • 20. - Phototherapy 181
  • 21. - Reworking the Family Album 190
  • 22. - The Daughter's Gaze 196
  • 23. - Class Confusion or Cultural Solidarity? 202
  • 24. - Cultural Sniper: Passing/Out 204
  • 25. - The Artist and Illness 212
  • 26. - 'the Crisis Project: 218
  • Notes on 'the Final Project: A Photofantasy and Phototherapeutic Exploration of Life and Death' 222
  • Notes to Part Three 228
  • Recommended Reading 231
  • Exhibitions by Jo Spence 237
  • Resources Resources List 239
  • Index 240
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