Environment, Education, and Society in the Asia-Pacific: Local Traditions and Global Discourses

By David Yencken; John Fien et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Interdisciplinary research is collaborative research, and the international and cross-cultural scope of the research we report in this book means that a large team of researchers was involved. The names of those who are direct contributors to this book are provided in the 'List of Contributors'. However, many others have also been involved. In fact, a team of nearly forty researchers, research assistants and graduate students from sixteen countries have worked on various aspects of this study. The rich depth of local knowledge and sources that characterize the discussion of cultural influences on environmental discourses in Asia and the Pacific in Chapters 3 to 8 would not have been possible without this very committed research team. Similarly, it would have been impossible to conduct the questionnaire research or the focus group interviews without their cooperation. Thus, we begin this statement of appreciation with a heartfelt tribute to all our partners in this research project.

All the chapters have been peer-reviewed for accuracy and balance of interpretation. Chapter reviewers included international experts in environmental attitude research and environmental sociology as well as others with expertise on individual countries, cultures or regions. We would especially like to thank the following for both their time and their timely advice which have added greatly to the quality of this work: Leah Burns, Peter Christoff, Debbie Heck, Zhu Jianfei, Stephen Kellert, Chatchai Ratanachai, Roy Rickson, Howard Sankey and Jane Williamson-Fien. Responsibility for the final form of the chapters, of course, remains with the authors and us, as editors.

The Australian Research Council provided initial funding for the research. This supported the appointments of Hok Pan Yuen and Florence Choo from the Statistical Consulting Centre, University of Melbourne, as statistical advisers and coordinators, and of Jennifer Lee and Sharon Connell as research assistants for the Australian components of the research and for the coordination of the international components. Grants from university research schemes in many of the participating countries also facilitated the research.

Grateful acknowledgements are made to the following:

-xvii-

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Environment, Education, and Society in the Asia-Pacific: Local Traditions and Global Discourses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures, Tables and Boxes vii
  • Foreword xii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Attitudes to Nature in the East and West 4
  • 2 - The Research 28
  • 3 - Environmental Attitudes and Education in Southern China 51
  • 4 - Oya-Shima-Kuni: Japan 75
  • 5 - Living Traditions: India 99
  • 6 - Unity and Diversity: South East Asia 113
  • 7 - Songlines and the Gondwanan Inheritance 135
  • 8 - Voices from the South West Pacific 163
  • 9 - Young People and the Environment 189
  • 10 - Young People and the Environment 221
  • 11 - Listening to the Voice of Youth 251
  • Appendix A 276
  • Appendix B 288
  • Bibliography 313
  • Index 330
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