Environment, Education, and Society in the Asia-Pacific: Local Traditions and Global Discourses

By David Yencken; John Fien et al. | Go to book overview

8

Voices from the South West Pacific

John Fien, Gewa Au, Paul Keown, Premila Kumar and Sereana Takivakatini

Our identity as human beings remains tied to our land, to our cultural practices, our systems of authority and social control, our intellectual traditions, our concepts of spirituality and to our systems of resource ownership and exchange. We are part of the environment; we live with the environment; we rely on the environment. Destroy this relationship and you damage, sometimes irrevocably, individual beings and the environment we know.

(Au Gewa Renagi, Alukuni Village Elder, Papua New Guinea, September 1998)

The South West Pacific contains many of the world's great sites of mystery and romance; the very names-Bali-hai, Espirito Santo, the Trobriand Islands, Pitcairn Island, Noumea, Tahiti, the Bay of Islands, Viti Levu and so on-have a magic all of their own. The South West Pacific covers five per cent of Earth's surface and, of course, is mostly ocean with but a sprinkling of islands, the vast majority of which are either the peaks of deep-sea volcanoes covered in tropical forest, or coconut fringed sandy isles and coral cays.

In part, the mystery and romance comes from the great distances that European and North American explorers had to sail to get to the South West Pacific. This was the last great region to be colonized, many islands in the late nineteenth century and others not until well into the twentieth century. The South West Pacific is where Gauguin retreated for new experiences of light and colour to paint, where Robert Louis Stevenson settled to write, and where James A. Mitchener was inspired to pen Tales of the South Pacific, from which Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein II composed their Broadway musical, South Pacific.

The South West Pacific stretches from the coasts of Papua New Guinea, Australia and New Zealand eastwards to include the small island states of Samoa, Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga, Tuvalu, the Solomon Islands, Palau, the Cook Islands and Kiribati, and the French territories of Tahiti and New Caledonia. The waters of the South West Pacific have seen the great Polynesian canoe odysseys and the misnamed 'voyages of discovery' of

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Environment, Education, and Society in the Asia-Pacific: Local Traditions and Global Discourses
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures, Tables and Boxes vii
  • Foreword xii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Attitudes to Nature in the East and West 4
  • 2 - The Research 28
  • 3 - Environmental Attitudes and Education in Southern China 51
  • 4 - Oya-Shima-Kuni: Japan 75
  • 5 - Living Traditions: India 99
  • 6 - Unity and Diversity: South East Asia 113
  • 7 - Songlines and the Gondwanan Inheritance 135
  • 8 - Voices from the South West Pacific 163
  • 9 - Young People and the Environment 189
  • 10 - Young People and the Environment 221
  • 11 - Listening to the Voice of Youth 251
  • Appendix A 276
  • Appendix B 288
  • Bibliography 313
  • Index 330
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 341

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.