Entrepreneurship: The Way Ahead

By Harold P. Welsch | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Complex undertakings always require the contributions of a team including not only the authors, but individuals working in the background who help take the idea and move it into reality. The original idea emanated from a senior scholars' conference held in conjunction with an annual meeting of the U.S. Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) sponsored by the Coleman Foundation. This roundtable discussion, spearheaded by the Council of Entrepreneurship Awareness and Education (CEAE) led to the identification of gaps in our field and forced us to look ahead to see where the field is going. Hence the title of the book. Through the foresight of the board of the Coleman Foundation, including John E. Hughes and Michael W. Hennessy, funds were allocated to the commissioning and writing of many significant white papers which formed the basis of this book. Internationally recognized scholars were selected to collect their best thoughts about where the field of entrepreneurship might be three to five years from now and commit these to paper so we can disseminate them to the community.

To the many editors at Routledge, we are grateful for their professional assistance as well as my staff, Lynne Wiora, Dajana Vucinic, Ilya Meiertal, Edward Papabathini, John Lanigan, and Dan Jarczyk who have spent many hours typing, tracking down references, editing, copying, and the dozens of tasks required to produce a quality product.

Dean Art Kraft, Alex Devience, Scott Young, and the Management Department of DePaul University allowed me the time to concentrate on completing the manuscript. Chairman John E. Hughes and President Michael W. Hennessy of the Coleman Foundation provided the guidance and focus on entrepreneurship development and had the courage to risk capital entrusted to their care into this project. For their moral and financial support we are forever grateful.

Harold P. Welsch, Ph.D.
Coleman Foundation Chair in Entrepreneurship
Professor of Management

August 18, 2003

-xvi-

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