Entrepreneurship: The Way Ahead

By Harold P. Welsch | Go to book overview

Chapter 20

Gerald E. Hills
University of Illinois at Chicago


ENTREPRENEURSHIP EDUCATION: MARKET SEGMENTATION AND LEARNER NEEDS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AS A SUBJECT is blossoming like the spring-time flower with new layers of unfolding detail. The entrepreneurship layers include new knowledge never before revealed and new entrepreneurship learner segments with layers of unique needs. The beauty of entrepreneurship, as in the beauty of the flower, is in the minute elements that are juxtapositioned into an impressive, larger whole. There are many different types and forms of entrepreneurship and this complexity is beginning to be reflected in entrepreneurship education programming. Although other disciplines, such as management and marketing, historically began in universities with one course offering, they have evolved into the teaching of numerous courses on subtopics within their conceptual and definitional domains. This blossoming of course offerings was made possible by the generation of new knowledge combined with conceptual and theoretical development of the management and marketing disciplines. Scholars delineated several historical "schools of marketing thought" including, today, managerial marketing and, more recently, even a proposed "entrepreneurial marketing" school, described earlier in this book.

Similarly, entrepreneurship, despite its short life as a new discipline, has already evolved from its earliest focus on an "entrepreneur personality characteristics school of thought" to a more holistic, resource view of entrepreneurship, modeled as a process. Just as historically occurred in marketing, the entrepreneurship field is blossoming into a variety of important subjects. There is increased specialization of researchers and teachers so as to develop more compelling scientific explanations of entrepreneurship processes and their outcomes. And market forces are playing an important role by influencing this

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