Coping with Globalization

By Aseem Prakash; Jeffrey A. Hart | Go to book overview

Coping with globalization

An introduction 1

Aseem Prakash and Jeffrey A. Hart

This volume examines the challenges posed by economic globalization to business and public policy and how governments and firms may address them. We begin with the premise that actors seek to cope with economic globalization because they perceive it as changing their economic and political landscapes, thereby creating new opportunities and threats. Unlike many other works on the subject, this volume does not advocate either resisting globalization (Boyer and Drache, 1996; Mittelman, 1996; Gills, forthcoming) or embracing it (Ohmae, 1991). Everyone does not benefit from economic integration; there are "winners" and "losers." Since the distribution of its costs and benefits is asymmetrical across countries, sectors (Midford, 1993), firms (Milner, 1988), and factors (Rogowski, 1989), there is a need to "cope" with it. 2

Firms and governments, the relevant actors in this volume, may choose not to respond to every opportunity or threat. When they choose to respond, their actions may be inefficient, ineffective or inequitable, only serving to accentuate the maladaption. Thus, the first issue addressed in this volume is: how does globalization impact a given actor's set of opportunities and threats, and consequently, should the actor respond? Second, what strategies are available to the actor? Actors could cope either individually or collectively, or some combination of both. They could modify extant institutions or create new ones. Strategies available to firms and governments may also differ-firms are mobile while states are not, and states can theoretically retreat to autarchy while firms cannot. On the other hand, both firms and governments can restructure-firms can outsource their components and governments can privatize/outsource production of public services. 3 Third, why should firms and governments choose specific coping strategies? What are the political, ideational and/or economic factors behind these choices? Fourth, assuming that these strategies have well-defined objectives, what is our assessment for their future success? Finally, what lessons can be distilled and generalized to other actors or issue areas?

Economic globalization is not an inexorable and/or irreversible process. Its impact is not ephemeral; it is causing long-term structural changes in the global economy, especially in the nature and extent of integration of

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coping with Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures viii
  • Preface xi
  • Coping with Globalization - An Introduction 1
  • Part I 27
  • 1 - A Race to the Bottom or Governance from the Top? 31
  • 2 - Convergence and Sovereignty 52
  • 3 - Environmental Regulations and the Global Strategies of Multinational Enterprises 77
  • 4 - Globalization and Federalism 94
  • Part II 115
  • 5 - Technonationalism and Cooperation in a Globalizing Industry 117
  • 6 - Dialing for Dollars 148
  • Part III 171
  • 7 - Marketing Money 173
  • 8 - Does Globalization Sap the Fiscal Power of the State? 198
  • Coping with Globalization - A Conclusion 225
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.