Coping with Globalization

By Aseem Prakash; Jeffrey A. Hart | Go to book overview

Part I

This part focuses on key conceptual issues regarding how globalization is reconfiguring policy spaces and the strategies of governments and firms to cope with it. Debora Spar and David Yoffie examine conditions that facilitate "races to the bottom" and "governance from the top". Sylvia Ostry focuses on the politics and dynamics of "deep integration" and the challenges they pose for the World Trade Organization (WTO). Alan Rugman and Alain Verbeke discuss how multinational enterprises (MNEs) can cope with environmental regulations that differ across jurisdictions. Alfred Aman probes the implications of the recent United States Supreme Court rulings on the subject of federalism and their impact on the abilities of the federal government to devise effective coping strategies.

One of the enduring themes in globalization literature is the retreat of the state, its eroding sovereignty and, consequently, its reduced capacities to enforce stringent environmental and labor laws. Further, globalized stock markets and an increasing scrutiny of firm performance by sophisticated investors are forcing MNEs to cut costs. As Spar and Yoffie note, these pressures on MNEs and governments are viewed as contributing to races to the bottom: the increasingly mobile MNEs search for lower levels of wages or regulation, thereby forcing national governments to converge towards lower standards. Such races, therefore, enfeeble national governments to perform the crucial functions of governance. To curb harmful races, international regimes and institutions could be established. Such governance from the top creates new rules, mitigating incentives for governments to participate in these races.

What facilitates such races? Spar and Yoffie suggest that the necessary conditions for races to occur are: (1) minimal border controls, and (2) regulation and factor costs that differ across national markets. Given the necessary conditions, races are most likely to occur when products are relatively homogeneous, cross-border differentials are significant, and both sunk and transaction costs are minimal. To check such races, governance from the top is more likely when there are significant negative externalities, races cascade through consecutive stages, and there are domestic coalitions with interests to curb such races.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coping with Globalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures viii
  • Preface xi
  • Coping with Globalization - An Introduction 1
  • Part I 27
  • 1 - A Race to the Bottom or Governance from the Top? 31
  • 2 - Convergence and Sovereignty 52
  • 3 - Environmental Regulations and the Global Strategies of Multinational Enterprises 77
  • 4 - Globalization and Federalism 94
  • Part II 115
  • 5 - Technonationalism and Cooperation in a Globalizing Industry 117
  • 6 - Dialing for Dollars 148
  • Part III 171
  • 7 - Marketing Money 173
  • 8 - Does Globalization Sap the Fiscal Power of the State? 198
  • Coping with Globalization - A Conclusion 225
  • Index 239
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.