Banking on Knowledge: The Genesis of the Global Development Network

By Diane Stone | Go to book overview

3

The instrumentalisation of development knowledge

Knut G. Nustad and Ole J. Sending


Introduction

The Global Development Network (GDN) is a network in the making of scholars, policy makers and donors that aims to create and share knowledge related to development efforts. Originating from and organised by the World Bank, the GDN forms part of its strategy of becoming a 'knowledge bank'. The GDN thus plays a part in the World Bank's emphasis on, first, the role of knowledge in social and economic development; and, second, the part played by civil society actors in addressing development issues.

The inaugural conference of the GDN in Bonn was organised under the heading 'Bridging Knowledge and Policy'. The main topic raised and discussed was how think tanks, research institutions and others could contribute to making knowledge more relevant to development policy. A key goal, according to the conference programme, was to 'enhance the quality and availability of policy-oriented research and strengthen the institutions which undertake this work'. (www.gdnet.org/bonn).

This is an important initiative that recognises and sets out to redress the general lack of communication between policy makers and researchers. It was therefore with a certain expectation that one of the authors arrived in Bonn hoping that he would be present at the launch of an institution that would provide a forum for discussions that included policy makers and researchers, thereby contributing to the institutionalisation of a sense of critical self-reflection in the development community. Critical analyses and insights about current development practices and problems seem to require a degree of detachment-a certain distance from the imperative of making research directly relevant to the needs of policy makers. The GDN has the potential to become an institution that will assume a certain degree of autonomy from the world of policy making but that could still deliver important insights into it.

However, the Bonn meeting left the impression that establishing the necessary distance and detachment from policy making proved more difficult than anticipated. A possible explanation, and a line of critique that was voiced by several participants at the meeting, was that discussions at the GDN stayed too much within the confines of a neo-liberal approach, where development is

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Banking on Knowledge: The Genesis of the Global Development Network
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.