Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey

By Joy A. Palmer; Liora Bresler et al. | Go to book overview

Further reading

The place of publication is London unless otherwise stated.


a
Aldrich, R. and Gordon, P., Dictionary of British Educationists, Woburn Press, 1989.
Andrews, L., 'The School Meals Service', British Journal of Educational Studies, 20 (1), pp. 70-5, 1972.

b
Banks, O., 'Morant and the Secondary School Regulations of 1904'. British Journal of Educational Studies, 3, pp. 33-41, 1954.

c
Chester, D.N., 'Robert Morant and Michael Sadler', Public Administration, 29, pp. 109-15, 1950.
--'Morant and Sadler-Further Evidence', Public Administration, 31, pp. 49-54, 1953.

d
Daglish, N., 'The Morant-Chulalongkorn Affair of 1893-94', Journal of Educational Administration and History, 15, pp. 16-23, 1983.
--'Robert Morant's Hidden Agenda? The Origins of the Medical Treatment of School-children', History of Education, 19, pp. 139-48, 1990.
--Education Policy-Making in England and Wales: The Crucible Years, 1895-1911, Woburn Press, 1996.

e
Eaglesham, E.J.R., 'The Centenary of Sir Robert Morant', British Journal of Educational Studies, 11, pp. 5-18, 1963.
--The Foundations of 20th Century Education in England, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1967.

h
Holmes, E.G.A., What Is and What Might Be, Constable, 1911.

l
Lowe, R., 'Robert Morant and the Secondary School Regulations of 1904', Journal of Educational Administration and History, 16, pp. 37-46, 1984.

m
Markham, V., 'Robert Morant-Some Personal Reminiscences', Public Administration, 28, pp. 249-62, 1950.

s
Selby Bigge, L.A., 'Morant, Robert', in Dictionary of National Biography, 1912-21, ed. H.W.C. Davis and J.R.H. Weaver, Oxford University Press, 1927.
--The Board of Education, G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1927.
Smith, F., A History of English Elementary Education, 1760-1902, University of London Press, 1931.

G.R.BATHO


EUGENIO MARÍA DE HOSTOS 1839-1903

In order for humans to be humans, that is, worthy of realizing their life goals, nature bestowed them with awareness of herself, the ability to know their own origins, their own strengths and frailties, their own transcendence and interdependence, their rights and obligations, their own freedom and responsibilities, the capability for self-improvement and for self-ennobling of their ideal existence. 1

Eugenio Maria de Hostos has been thought of as the John Dewey of the Spanish-speaking world. 2 While there are remarkable similarities between these two educator-philosopher-political scientist-humanists, the fact remains that Hostos preceded Dewey by twenty years and died several years before Dewey published his influential works, How We Think (1910) and Democracy and Education (1916). Hostos was an educator and writer

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Fifty Major Thinkers on Education: From Confucius to Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Chronological List of Contents v
  • Alphabetical List of Contents viii
  • Preface xiii
  • Confucius 551-479 Bce 1
  • Further Reading 5
  • Notes 9
  • Books on Aristotle''s Educational Ideas 20
  • Saint Augustine 354-430 25
  • John Wesley 1703-91 50
  • Kant''s Major Writings 64
  • Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel 1770-1831 84
  • John Henry Newman 1801-90 100
  • Herbert Spencer 1820-1903 120
  • Thomas Henry Huxley 1825-95 128
  • Further Reading 146
  • Alfred Binet 1857-1911 160
  • Émile Durkheim 1858-1917 165
  • Addams'' Major Writings 187
  • Notes 191
  • Harvard (1924-39) 205
  • Émile Jaques-Dalcroze 1865-1950 206
  • Martin Buber 1878-1965 239
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