Transnational Organised Crime: Perspectives on Global Security

By Adam Edwards; Peter Gill | Go to book overview

tember 2001, the nascent 'War on Terrorism' should not be allowed to preclude a more imaginative debate over security in the new world order.

The contributions to Part I and the seminar discussions provoked by them differ in attributing the origins of TOC to: the hegemonic influence of US domestic and foreign policy concerns; the process of European political and economic integration; the construction of a new, neo-liberal, world order; and even the utility of this threat for key actors within the United Nations, who were seeking to advance their own bureaucratic interests in increasing the profile of crime control on the UN's policy agenda during the 1990s. Common to these interpretations, however, is scepticism about official narratives of the threat posed by TOC and the efficacy of those policing strategies entailed in these narratives. As Sheptycki argues, to be sceptical is not to deny the social harm that can be caused by the illicit activities that have been conflated into the idea of TOC, such as trafficking in drugs, people, nuclear materials and body parts. But we must also acknowledge the social harm caused by other practices, such as the dumping of toxic waste, insider dealing, tax evasion, fraud and the systematic corruption of state 'kleptocrats', that have, hitherto, been absent from policy discourse on the threat of TOC to global security. To recognise this broader repertoire of social harm and to acknowledge the possibility of governmental interventions that transcend the self-referential appeal for more refined law enforcement is to understand that global security is fundamentally a question of political deliberation, not technical expertise. Subsequent parts to this book examine the contribution that social scientific research on TOC can make to this deliberation.


References
Benyon, J. (1996) 'The politics of police co-operation in the European Union', International Journal of the Sociology of Law 24: 353-79.
Bigo, D. (1994) 'The European internal security field: stakes and rivalries in a newly developing area of police intervention', in M. Anderson and M. den Boer (eds) Policing Across National Boundaries. London: Pinter.
--(2000) 'Liaison officers in Europe: new officers in the European security field', in J. Sheptycki (ed.) Issues in Transnational Policing. London: Routledge.
Block, A. (1991) Perspectives on Organised Crime: Essays in Opposition. Dordrecht: Kluwer.
Edwards, A. and Gill, P. (2002a) 'Crime as enterprise? The case of "transnational organised crime"', Crime, Law and Social Change 37: 203-23.
--(2002b) 'The politics of "transnational organised crime": discourse, reflexivity and the narration of "threat"', British Journal of Politics and International Relations 4, 2: 245-70.
Nadelmann, E. (1993) Cops Across Borders: The Internationalization of U.S. Criminal Law Enforcement. University Park, PN: Pennsylvania State University Press.
Ruggiero, V. (2000) Crime and Markets: Essays in Anti-Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

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Transnational Organised Crime: Perspectives on Global Security
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures x
  • Tables xi
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • References 6
  • Part I - Origins of the Concept 7
  • References 11
  • 1 - Transnational Organised Crime 13
  • 2 - Europe's Response to Transnational Organised Crime 28
  • Notes 39
  • References 40
  • 3 - Global Law Enforcement as a Protection Racket 42
  • Note 55
  • References 56
  • Part II - Measurements and Interpretations 59
  • References 64
  • 4 - Measuring Transnational Organised Crime 65
  • Note 77
  • 5 - Classify, Report and Measure 78
  • References 95
  • 6 - The Network Paradigm Applied to Criminal Organisations 97
  • References 113
  • 7 - Transnational Organised Crime 114
  • Notes 125
  • Part III - Case Studies 127
  • 8 - Bad Boys in the Baltics 131
  • Notes 141
  • 9 - Controlling Drug Trafficking in Central Europe 143
  • Note 154
  • 10 - Recognising Organised Crime's Victims 157
  • Notes 171
  • Part IV - Current and Prospective Responses 175
  • References 181
  • 11 - The Legal Regulation of Transnational Organised Crime 183
  • References 193
  • 12 - Countering the Chameleon Threat of Dirty Money 195
  • Notes 209
  • 13 - Criminal Asset-Stripping 212
  • 14 - Proteiform Criminalities 227
  • Notes 239
  • References 240
  • 15 - Organised Crime and the Conjunction of Criminal Opportunity Framework 241
  • References 262
  • 16 - After Transnational Organised Crime? 264
  • Note 279
  • Index 282
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