Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

By Patrick D. Murphy; Marwan M. Kraidy | Go to book overview

really know if I can call myself a native ethnographer, even though I share with them the same nationality, history, religion and language (although many of them have Kurdish or Arab ethnic backgrounds, they are at the same time bilingual). Then the significant differences in cultural practices and everyday realities, not only between the ethnographer and the informants but also among the informants themselves, require us to place a special emphasis on where ethnographies take place - both the overall geography, such as a city, town or country, and smaller locations, such as shops, a radio station, home, etc. Situating our informants geographically, socially and culturally might help us better understand the relationships between their media consumption and everyday practices.

In this chapter my goal was to illustrate the need for a more ethnographic approach to the study of media audiences by problematizing the issues of textuality and context. Such an approach requires not only a radical contextualism of the ethnographic account and the physical location where the ethnography takes place, but also the spatial context of media consumption. Instead of focusing on a specific radio channel or show and its audience, I attempted to map the media use in a specific geographic location in the periphery of Turkey in order to understand the hegemonic interplay between the center and periphery, the global and local, and the West and the East. At the end of my fieldwork, I realized that multisited ethnographic method not only made it possible for me to avoid the constraints of a text or genre but also helped me to locate my research, situate myself, and contextualize the social, cultural, political, geographic and ideological elements that shape people's engagement with media in Sanliurfa.


References
Alasuutari, P. (1999). Introduction: Three phases of reception studies. In P. Alasuutari (ed.), Rethinking the media audience: The new agenda (pp. 1-21). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
Ang, I. (1990). Culture and communication: Towards an ethnographic critique of media consumption in the transnational system. European Journal of Communication 5, 239-260.
Ang, I. (1993). Desperately seeking the audience. London and New York: Routledge.
Ang, I. (1996). Ethnography and radical contextualism in audience studies. In J. Hay, L. Grossberg and E. Wartella (eds), The audience and its landscape (pp. 247-262). Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
Appadurai, A. (1990). Disjuncture and difference in the global cultural economy. Public Culture 2(2), 1-24.
Clifford, J. and Marcus, G. E. (eds) (1986). Writing culture: The poetics and politics of ethnography. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.
Corner, J. (1991). Meaning, genre and context: The problematics of "public knowledge" in the new audience studies. In J. Curran and M. Gurevitch (eds), Mass media and society (pp. 267-284). New York: Edward Arnold.

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Towards an Ethnographic Approach to Global Media Studies 3
  • Notes 16
  • Part II - Situating Ethnography in Global Media Studies 21
  • 2 - The Problem of Textuality in Ethnographic Audience Research 23
  • References 37
  • 3 - Passing Ethnographies 40
  • Notes 54
  • 4 - Where is Audience Ethnography's Fieldwork? 57
  • 5 - Audience Letters and Letter-Writers 72
  • 6 - Rituals in the Modern World 90
  • Part III - Researching the Local 107
  • 7 - Negotiation and Position 109
  • References 123
  • 8 - "Now That You'Re Going Home, Are You Going to Write About the Natives You Studied?" 125
  • Notes 144
  • 9 - Methodology as Lived Experience 147
  • Notes 162
  • 10 - On the Border 165
  • References 182
  • 11 - Radio's Early Arrival in Rural Appalachia 184
  • Part IV - Articulating Globalization Through Ethnography 213
  • 12 - "Ask the West, Will Dinosaurs Come Back?" 215
  • Notes 231
  • References 232
  • 13 - Where the Global Meets the Local 234
  • 14 - Chasing Echoes 257
  • References 274
  • 15 - Globalization Avant La Lettre? 276
  • Notes 292
  • Part V - Afterword 297
  • 16 - Media Ethnography 299
  • References 306
  • Index 308
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.