Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

By Patrick D. Murphy; Marwan M. Kraidy | Go to book overview

abused by him. Sex scenes between Leia and Ralf, and between Ralf and his other lovers/clients, are seen as shocking and disturbing by most people in Montes Claros. Bruno then falls in love with a poor illiterate peasant, Luana, who happens to be his cousin, but she had lost her memory in an accident and cannot remember in the beginning who she is. He brings Luana to live with him, but his two spoiled kids do not accept her. His daughter (Lia) and son (Marcos) are portrayed as ex-drug addicts. Lia falls in love with a poor guitar player, and is one of the most loved characters in the story - she is seen as beautiful and elegant, and is the fashion promoter in the narrative. She makes sexual advances towards her lover, revealing that she has sexual experience in a way most criticized in Montes Claros. Nevertheless, sex scenes between Lia and her lover - as well as those between Bruno and Luana - are enjoyed as romantic love scenes by most people, only being criticized by older and more religious people. Marcos, Bruno's son, has an affair with a former teenage girlfriend, Liliana. Liliana is the daughter of a senator, who is also a close friend of Bruno, is unhappily married, and stays most of the time away from his family, in Brasília (the federal capital), where he works. Liliana gets pregnant, and the two families try to set a solution, but Marcos runs away on the day of the wedding. Marcos is seen as an irresponsible youngster who only changes when his father has an accident and he has to start working on the family farms. Liliana is also seen in Montes Claros as another bad example for girls and young women who might think that having sex before marriage is OK, promoting teenage pregnancy. She also seems to promote such behavior because she has a happy ending with Marcos when the baby is born - this is analyzed by Montes Claros viewers as even a worse example, because young girls might be deluded, thinking that early pregnancy is a solution with a happy ending.


References
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Briggs, J. (1986). Kapluna daughter. In P. Golde (ed.), Women in the field: Anthropological experiences. Berkeley: University of California Press.
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Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Towards an Ethnographic Approach to Global Media Studies 3
  • Notes 16
  • Part II - Situating Ethnography in Global Media Studies 21
  • 2 - The Problem of Textuality in Ethnographic Audience Research 23
  • References 37
  • 3 - Passing Ethnographies 40
  • Notes 54
  • 4 - Where is Audience Ethnography's Fieldwork? 57
  • 5 - Audience Letters and Letter-Writers 72
  • 6 - Rituals in the Modern World 90
  • Part III - Researching the Local 107
  • 7 - Negotiation and Position 109
  • References 123
  • 8 - "Now That You'Re Going Home, Are You Going to Write About the Natives You Studied?" 125
  • Notes 144
  • 9 - Methodology as Lived Experience 147
  • Notes 162
  • 10 - On the Border 165
  • References 182
  • 11 - Radio's Early Arrival in Rural Appalachia 184
  • Part IV - Articulating Globalization Through Ethnography 213
  • 12 - "Ask the West, Will Dinosaurs Come Back?" 215
  • Notes 231
  • References 232
  • 13 - Where the Global Meets the Local 234
  • 14 - Chasing Echoes 257
  • References 274
  • 15 - Globalization Avant La Lettre? 276
  • Notes 292
  • Part V - Afterword 297
  • 16 - Media Ethnography 299
  • References 306
  • Index 308
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