Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives

By Patrick D. Murphy; Marwan M. Kraidy | Go to book overview

media researchers, such a return to structural concerns must involve a combined commitment to macro and micro questions of power and identity that move beyond singular text- or place-focused resistance and accommodation studies and towards a translocal understanding of globalization.

That the cultures of globalization are hybrid is becoming conventional wisdom. However, what is missing is a systematic examination of the shades of cultural hybridity and the social, cultural, political and economic agendas and forces that contribute to their formation. Hence the two related agendas that should be initiated to remedy this gaping hole. First, global media scholarship must make a commitment to empirical research to complement its theoretical arguments. This should not be misconstrued as a dismissal of the discursive in favor of methodological fetishism. Rather, our point is grounded in the belief that dialogue between theory and research is crucial for intellectual activity that has meaningful implications for the everyday. Second, we advocate that global media studies embraces real interdisciplinarity, because the complexity of globalization and its multifaceted processes require diverse expertise. Namely, we call for research and theory that cuts through the categories of the political, economic and cultural. Transnational capitalism has successfully blurred the boundaries between these spheres, and extended this mixed reality to all aspects of our lives. If our scholarship is to have any relevance, it is imperative that we catch up. The best place to begin is everyday life, where the political, economic and cultural are articulated through the mediated. Herein lies the promise of translocal ethnography.


References
Abu-Lughod, L. (1999). The interpretation of culture(s) after television. In S. Ortner (ed.), The fate of "culture": Geertz and beyond. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Ang, I. (1985). Watching Dallas. London: Routledge.
Appadurai, A. (1991). Global ethnoscapes: Notes and queries for a transnational anthropology. In M. Fox (ed.), Recapturing anthropology: Working in the present (pp. 191-210). Santa Fe, NM: School for American Research Press.
Appadurai, A. (1996). Modernity at large: Cultural dimensions of globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Bhabha, H. (1994). The location of culture. London: Routledge.
Buckingham, D. (1987). Public secrets: EastEnders and its audience. London: BFI.
Curran, J. and Park, M. J. (2000). De-Westernizing media studies. London: Routledge.
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Fox, M. (ed.) (1991). Recapturing anthropology: Working in the present. Santa Fe, NM: School for American Research Press.
Galtung, J. (1971). A structural theory of imperialism, Journal of Peace Research 8(2), 81-117.
García-Canclini, N. (1989). Culturas híbridas: Estrategias para entrar y salir de la modernidad. Mexico City: Grijalbo. Translated as Hybrid cultures: Strategies for

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Global Media Studies: Ethnographic Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Towards an Ethnographic Approach to Global Media Studies 3
  • Notes 16
  • Part II - Situating Ethnography in Global Media Studies 21
  • 2 - The Problem of Textuality in Ethnographic Audience Research 23
  • References 37
  • 3 - Passing Ethnographies 40
  • Notes 54
  • 4 - Where is Audience Ethnography's Fieldwork? 57
  • 5 - Audience Letters and Letter-Writers 72
  • 6 - Rituals in the Modern World 90
  • Part III - Researching the Local 107
  • 7 - Negotiation and Position 109
  • References 123
  • 8 - "Now That You'Re Going Home, Are You Going to Write About the Natives You Studied?" 125
  • Notes 144
  • 9 - Methodology as Lived Experience 147
  • Notes 162
  • 10 - On the Border 165
  • References 182
  • 11 - Radio's Early Arrival in Rural Appalachia 184
  • Part IV - Articulating Globalization Through Ethnography 213
  • 12 - "Ask the West, Will Dinosaurs Come Back?" 215
  • Notes 231
  • References 232
  • 13 - Where the Global Meets the Local 234
  • 14 - Chasing Echoes 257
  • References 274
  • 15 - Globalization Avant La Lettre? 276
  • Notes 292
  • Part V - Afterword 297
  • 16 - Media Ethnography 299
  • References 306
  • Index 308
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