Rethinking Global Political Economy: Emerging Issues, Unfolding Odysseys

By Mary Ann Tétreault; Robert A. Denemark et al. | Go to book overview

4

Creating global hegemony

Culture and the market

Barbara Jenkins

Introduction

The deconstruction of realist notions of power in the international relations literature led to alternative considerations of how global power is established and spread. Amongst these critical approaches, theories based on Gramsci's notion of hegemony are particularly persuasive in their explanations of how global capitalism became dominant and naturalized as a system of power (Cox 1987; Gill 1993; Mittelman 1996). According to these accounts, global politics take place in the context of a world order that is in part constructed and naturalized by ideas and ideologies. The current world order, characterized by Robert Cox as Pax Americana, is constituted on the basis of a hegemonic liberal economic discourse that privileges the free movement of goods, money, and investment across borders. Although couched in terms of openness, free trade, and deregulation, this ideology in fact benefits the United States disproportionately because of the predominance of US multinationals and banks in the global economy. In addition to the US government, various international institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO) also reinforce neoliberal economic ideology. OECD countries, with the United States exerting hegemonic dominance, finance and control these ostensibly "international" organizations.

Stephen Gill (1988) amplifies Cox's ideas by positing the formation of a transnational bourgeoisie, exemplified by the Trilateral Commission, which orchestrates and reinforces the spread of Pax Americana. Both Gill's and Cox's accounts describe a class-based, capitalist world order structured by the mode of production. Specific actors may construct world orders in highly ideological terms, but such orders are ultimately forged on the basis of a particular mode of production, in the case of Pax Americana, one based on the internationalization of production processes.

Although these approaches provide essential insights into the formation of a kind of transnational rule outside the realm of raw power politics, they lack a cultural dimension. Despite their heavy reliance on the work of Antonio Gramsci, who placed particular emphasis on the role of cultural institutions in embedding capitalism in social practices, none of these interpretations makes reference to

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rethinking Global Political Economy: Emerging Issues, Unfolding Odysseys
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Contributors xii
  • Series Editors' Preface xv
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - New Odysseys in Global Political Economy 3
  • Notes 19
  • Part II - Aids to Navigation 21
  • 2 - Analytical Advances to Address New Dynamics 23
  • 3 - Metageographical Moments 46
  • Notes 64
  • 4 - Creating Global Hegemony 65
  • Part III - Sacking the City 87
  • 5 - Globalization as Global History 89
  • 6 - Mergers, Stagflation, and the Logic of Globalization 109
  • 7 - Global Dreams and Local Anger 147
  • Part IV - Repair of the World 163
  • 8 - Globalization, "New" Trade Theory, and a Keynesian Reformist Project 165
  • 9 - Exploitation and Solidarity 195
  • 10 - The Globalization of Human Affairs 211
  • Part V - Conclusion 227
  • 11 - Alternative Directions in the Study of the Global Political Economy 229
  • Bibliography 238
  • Index 285
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.