The President's Man: Leo Crowley and Franklin Roosevelt in Peace and War

By Stuart L. Weiss | Go to book overview

7
A Third Term for the President

B y late June 1940, Leo Crowley was ready to resign from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The president had asked him to deal personally with bank problems in Utica and Syracuse, New York, indicating that they were embarrassing Governor Lehman and could embarrass him. He had done so. In March, he had told the president that the Syracuse bank could be saved immediately, the "problem case in Utica" in six weeks, and the president had thanked him. In fact, Crowley underestimated the Utica problem, and it was almost summer before it was properly resolved. Even so, Roosevelt thanked him again, and Lehman was obviously grateful.1

Crowley wanted to leave the FDIC, then, at June's end, after he signed the corporation's annual report. But he did not. The president needed him. He could "fix" possibly embarrassing bank problems, and he had friends and allies from Wall Street to Main Street and on both sides of the congressional aisle. More immediately important, he might be able to unite Broughton's regulars and Keller's rebel DPOW at July's Democratic National Convention; and most important, he alone might be able to secure Senator La Follette's endorsement and reactivate the Democratic-Progressive coalition in Wisconsin the president knew he would need in November. Crowley had to be persuaded to stay, at least for a while. And when Roosevelt asked, he could not refuse.2

That June, on the eve of the Democratic National Convention, helping the president meant working with Broughton to retain control of the Democratic party machinery in Wisconsin, and bringing the DPOW delegates into the party fold. Securing an overwhelming majority for the president at the convention was not the problem; all but three Garner delegates seemed safe. The problem lay down the road, in

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The President's Man: Leo Crowley and Franklin Roosevelt in Peace and War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Plunger 1
  • 2 - The Richelieu of Wisconsin 17
  • 3 - Cover-Up in the Capital, I 33
  • 4 - Cover-Up in the Capital, II 48
  • 5 - Banking and Politics 65
  • 6 - Private Enterprise and Public Service 81
  • 7 - A Third Term for the President 98
  • 8 - Alien Property Custodian, I 114
  • 9 - Alien Property Custodian, II 132
  • 10 - The Nation's £ 1 Pinch Hitter 148
  • 11 - Global Diplomat 165
  • 12 - Embattled 183
  • 13 - Germany, Politics, and Lend-Lease 200
  • 14 - The End of Lend-Lease 219
  • 15 - Epilogue 238
  • Primary Sources and Abbreviations Notes Index 245
  • Primary Sources and Abbreviations 247
  • Notes 249
  • Index 287
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