The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross

By Louis Maresca; Stuart Maslen | Go to book overview

2
The ICRC's draft rules to protect civilian populations
1955–1956

As early as the 1950s the ICRC identified the landmine as a weapon of special concern. One of the first efforts to limit the consequences of landmines was the ICRC's Draft Rules for the Limitation of the Dangers Incurred by the Civilian Population in Time of War published in 195620 (referred to below as 1956 Draft Rules). These rules were issued in response to developments in armaments and military doctrine, and the widespread injury and damage to civilian populations during the Second World War. As international humanitarian law was founded on the fundamental distinction between combatants and non-combatants, the ICRC was concerned that the proliferation of so-called 'blind' weapons and methods of warfare, which were unable or failed to take this distinction into account, would severely undermine the protection it afforded. The 1956 Draft Rules sought to affirm and supplement many of the principles found in earlier international humanitarian law treaties.

Work on the draft rules began in April 1954 with a meeting of outside experts. Based on the results of this meeting, the ICRC prepared a first draft document entitled 'Draft Rules for the Protection of the Civilian Population from the Dangers of Indiscriminate Warfare' (referred to below as the '1955 draft') which it then submitted to National Red and Red Crescent Societies and other individuals for comment. While this draft contained regulations on means and methods of warfare, there was no specific rule on the use of landmines. The ICRC nevertheless recognized the danger that these weapons posed to civilian populations. While Article 10(3) of the 1955 draft covers the use of 'delay-action' projectiles, the ICRC in its commentary discussed the broader category of 'delay-action' weapons, including both

____________________
20
Draft Rules for the Limitation of the Dangers Incurred by the Civilian Population in Time of War. Published by the International Committee of the Red Cross with commentary, Geneva, April 1958.

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 670

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.