The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross

By Louis Maresca; Stuart Maslen | Go to book overview

On going into the subject in greater detail, the ICRC was led to consider three cases of so-called “delay-action” weapons. The first is that of submarine mines, the use of which is, as we know, expressly governed by the Eighth Convention of1907. Then there are the delay-action mines which are used by armies during land operations and are, for example, buried in the ground or hidden in houses, and explode after the enemy has taken possession of the terrain. Finally, there is a third category – bombs and mines which are dropped from the air and have a delayed action in the sense that they explode after a given lapse of time or when they are touched.

Since the question of submarine mines is already governed by an international Convention, there is no call to consider it here. A legal solution of the second case, that of land mines etc., raises great di fficulties and the ICRC's study of the subject is not sufficiently advanced to enable it to propose a rule concerning it. The Committee proposes to continue its study of the question, however – and would greatly appreciate any opinions expressed with regard to it – in view of the danger to which this type of mine exposes the civilian population when they reoccupy their homes, even after peace has been re-established.

The ICRC has accordingly confined itself, for the time being, to drafting a rule referring solely to the third category, that is to say, to delay-action projectiles – having more particularly in mind the missiles of this type which would be used in “strategic” bombing. It appeared difficult, however, to prohibit the use of such weapons completely, for if they are confined to the military objectives themselves, their use is really equivalent to repeating the attack on the objective, and that being so, the justice of prohibiting them in particular might be questioned. […]


Draft Rules for the Limitation of the Dangers Incurred by
the Civilian Population in Time of War

Geneva
1956

Art. 15 — Safety measures and devices

Paragraph I.

If the Parties to the conflict make use of mines, they are bound, without prejudice to the stipulations of the VIIIth Hague Convention of 1907, to chart minefields. The chart shall be handed over, at the close of hostilities, to the adverse Party, and also to the authorities responsible for the safety of the civilian population.”

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Banning of Anti-Personnel Landmines: The Legal Contribution of the International Committee of the Red Cross
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 670

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.