Getting to Outcomes, 2004: Promoting Accountability through Methods and Tools for Planning, Implementation and Evaluation

By Matthew Chinman; Pamela Imm et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Alcohol, tobacco and other drugs, especially in youth, exact a high toll in local communities. Such substance use and abuse are linked to increased mortality and morbidity through substance-related violence, accidents, and crime. Substance abuse prevention programs not only improve the behavioral health of communities, but they save $4 to $5 in costs for drug abuse treatment and counseling for every dollar invested. Similarly, tobacco use is the number one cause of preventable death in the United States and is associated with substantial behavioral health costs. However, substance abuse and tobacco use prevention programs need to be implemented with quality in order to reap these benefits.

Local prevention practitioners face several challenges in implementing high-quality prevention programs, including the significant amount of knowledge and skills required, the large number of steps that need to be addressed (e.g., needs assessment, setting of priorities, planning and delivering programs, monitoring, and evaluation), and the wide variety of contexts in which prevention programs need to be implemented. These challenges have resulted in a large gap between the positive outcomes often achieved by prevention science and the lack of these outcomes by prevention practice at the local level. Information dissemination approaches such as the five regional Centers for the Application of Prevention Technology (CAPTs) and Internet resources such as the Decision Support System (http://www.preventiondss.org/) provide valuable information about available evidence-based programs; however, this information is not always integrated at the local level. This lack occurs in part because programs are often designed without consideration to their transportability. Thus, collaboration between the science and practice is needed.

To narrow the science-practice gap, this manual, Getting to Outcomes 2004: Promoting Accountability through Methods and Tools for Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation (GTO-04), presents a ten-step process that enhances practitioners' prevention skills while empowering them to plan, implement, and evaluate their own programs.

The GTO-04 manual was specifically designed to help any agency, school, or community coalition interested in improving the quality of their programs aimed at preventing or reducing drug and tobacco use among youth. The manual's text and

-iii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Getting to Outcomes, 2004: Promoting Accountability through Methods and Tools for Planning, Implementation and Evaluation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.