The Social Mode of Restoration Comedy

By Kathleen M. Lynch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
THE PERIOD OF ETHEREGE

IN THE twelve years from 1664 to 1676 Restoration comedy of manners became well established as a dramatic type. During these years Etherege and Wycherley produced their masterpieces, and a goodly number of other comic dramatists worked, with varying degrees of success, in the same tradition. Etherege's importance as the first dramatist to express the Restoration comic spirit with artistic completeness is now very generally recognized. The relation of his work and that of his immediate contemporaries to earlier English drama, and especially to précieuse drama, remains, however, an unsolved problem, inviting our attention.

When we consider The Comical Revenge, or Love in a Tub ( 1664),1 the first of Etherege's comedies, we find ourselves involved in the famous controversy as to the sources of Etherege's plays. This play, prominent critics assure us, effected a revolution in English comedy. We may agree with Gosse that Molière inspired the new comic program, or with Palmer that a change in English social life produced the miracle; in any event, we must accept Restoration comedy as a revolutionary rebirth of English comedy, if we choose to support a conventional point of view in this matter.

Edmund Gosse, to whom credit is due for having rescued the memory of Sir George Etherege from an oblivion of many years' duration,2 maintains that Etherege was greatly influenced by Molière, during those years when Molière's first comedies were

____________________
1
The play was seen by Evelyn in April, 1664. Evelyn, Diary, I, p. 401.
2
See the chapter on Etherege in Gosse Seventeenth Century Studies, of which the first edition was published in 1883.

-137-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Social Mode of Restoration Comedy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 246

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.