Toward a History of American Linguistics

By E. F.K. Koerner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Under the above heading usually come at least two kinds of statements, one referring to the various origins of the subjects treated in the present book, the other to the various persons who have helped the author, in one way or another, to put the volume together and, as I should like to think, have made the text much more readable.

As regards the first subject, I have always taken the attitude that one's intellectual property cannot be copyrighted by others, unless it was written for an encyclopedia or a collective work for which one has received payment and thus traded one's rights to a publisher. Cannibalizing one's own writings, as the late James McCawley used to call it, is fair game. For the benefit of the bibliographical sleuth, however, I am providing references to early locations where the subjects treated in the present volume-chapters 1, 6, and 9 have no published 'predecessor'-have been dealt with in some fashion, in all instances in much less developed form. 1

For chapter 2: "Toward a History of Americanist Linguistics". The Fourteenth LACUS Forum 1987 ed. by Sheila Embleton, 336-343. Lake Bluff, III.: Linguistic Society of Canada and the United States (LACUS), 1988.

For chapter 3: "The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis: A preliminary history and a bibliographical essay". Journal of Linguistic Anthropology 2.173-198 (1992).

For chapter 4: "Leonard Bloomfield and the Cours de linguistique générale". Cahiers Ferdinand de Saussure 43.55-63 (1989). 2

For chapter 5: "Bloomfieldian Linguistics and the Problem of 'Meaning': A chapter in the history and study of language". Jahrbuch für Amerikastudien/ German Yearbook of American Studies 15.162-183 (1970).

1 For those interested in further reincarnations of other (partial) versions of some of these articles, readers may wish refer to a fairly complete bibliography of my writings down to late 1999; see The Emergence of the Modern Language Sciences: Studies on the transition from historical-comparative to structural linguistics in honour of E.F.K. Koerner ed. by Sheila Embleton, John E. Joseph & Hans-Josef Niederehe (Amsterdam & Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1999), vol.I, xxi-lvii. For a still more detailed account, see E.F.K. Koerner: A bio-bibliography ed. by Pierre Swiggers (Leuven: Peeters for Centre International de Dialectologie Générale, 1999), iv, 195 pp.; 1 portr.

2 Of these seven titles, items 4 and 5 have been reprinted in Leonard Bloomfield: Critical assessments ed. by John G. Fought, vol.II, 142-166 and 210-217 (London & New York: Routledge, 1999), respectively.

-v-

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