The Art of Teaching Secondary English: Innovative and Creative Approaches

By David Stevens; Nicholas McGuinn | Go to book overview

Notes

3

Romantic words and worlds

1
The quotations from David Holbrook cited in this chapter are taken from the Seminar Papers of the Dartmouth Conference.
2
As early as 1886, the Cross Commission lent official support to Froebel's belief that pupil motivation and an element of play should be regarded as important elements in the teaching of writing in schools.
3
These four pre-1914 texts appeared on the Key Stage 3 English SAT papers for 2003. The three plays were set for the Shakespeare Paper. Treasure Island featured on the Reading Paper.
4
The non-fictional text types described in the National Literacy Strategy are: information, recount, explanation, instruction, persuasion and discursive writing.

4

The challenge of 'instrumental rationality'

1
Chris Smith was, at the time, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport.
2
Key Stage 3 SATs are compulsory for state school pupils working above National Curriculum Level 3.
3
Figures taken from The Independent, 10 September 2003.
4
Kress was writing here before the National Literacy Strategy - with its emphasis upon alternatives to the 'poetic' and 'literary' genres - was introduced into the school curriculum.
5
The passage is reproduced here as it was originally spelt and punctuated.
6
See the reference to Geoffrey Hill's poem September Song in the previous chapter.
7
Directed by James Britton, the Schools Council's Writing Across the Curriculum Project of the 1970s classified writing into three types: 'poetic' (relating to the language of the arts and literature); 'transactional' (relating to factual statements); and 'expressive' (relating to personal and 'creative' writing).
8
Elegy 2: To his Mistress Going to Bed.
9
The quotation is taken from Keats' Ode to a Nightingale.
10
Ariel had been imprisoned in a tree by the witch Sycorax and subsequently released by Prospero when he arrived on the island. Prospero uses the threat of re-imprisonment to ensure Ariel's obedience.

-141-

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The Art of Teaching Secondary English: Innovative and Creative Approaches
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • 1 - The Arts of English Teaching 1
  • 2 - Romantically Linked 29
  • 3 - Romantic Words and Worlds 51
  • 4 - The Challenge of 'Instrumental Rationality' 73
  • 5 - Taking the Mind to Other Things 95
  • 6 - Romantic Culture and the Intercultural Imperative 117
  • Notes 141
  • Bibliography 143
  • Index 151
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