Discourses in Place: Language in the Material World

By Ron Scollon; Suzie Wong Scollon | Go to book overview

4

Visual semiotics

THEORY

From real life to depicted life: Visual semiotics

In Chapter 3 we saw how we place our discourses in the world through a complex set of social performances. This interaction order, as Goffman calls it, is the way we accomplish our spoken, face-to-face discourse in the world and it is also the indexable world we use in this discourse. Now in this chapter we turn from the spoken, face-to-face discourses to the representations of that interaction order in images and signs.

In order to see our perspective here more clearly, we will return briefly to the picture of the street performer we looked at in Chapter 1 (1.03).

The scene is complex from the point of view of Goffman's interaction order. There is a street performer who stands as a statue until someone takes the action of donating money in his collection box. This is a typical platform event which we defined in Chapter 3 as:

someone or a small group performs as a spectacle for others to watch whether on an elevated platform or encircled by the group of watchers.

From the point of view of the platform event the interaction order consists of the spectacle and the viewers or audience and their relationships are displayed through the performance of the event on the one hand and the appreciation as audience on the other. At the same time, however, we noted that the 'audience' does not consist of isolated singles but, rather, of at least one with.

In the same way we might note a queue of people formed up in front of a ticket window to buy tickets for a movie, a concert, or a train trip. The queue itself is a unit of the interaction order but within the queue might be several withs - people who have come to buy tickets together and who throughout the queuing might

-82-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Discourses in Place: Language in the Material World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Geosemiotics 1
  • 2 - Indexicality 25
  • 3 - Interaction Order 45
  • 4 - Visual Semiotics 82
  • 5 - Interlude on Geosemiotics 106
  • 6 - Place Semiotics: Code Preference 116
  • 7 - Place Semiotics: Inscription 129
  • 8 - Place Semiotics: Emplacement 142
  • 9 - Place Semiotics: Discourses in Time and Space 166
  • 10 - Indexicality, Dialogicality, and Selection in Action 197
  • Glossary 208
  • References 218
  • Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.