The "Civil Society" Problematique: Deconstructing Civility and Southern Nigeria's Ethnic Radicalization

By Adedayo Oluwakayode Adekson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII

Analysis of the Process of Radicalization

HERETOFORE, I REVIEWED CONTEXTUAL EVIDENCE, WHICH SUGGESTED that the radicalization of Nigerian civil society on the whole and profiled organizations in particular was directly attributable to repression, underdevelopment and apparent or reputed instances of marginalization that occurred under both military and civilian governments in Nigeria from independence to 2002. 1 Due to the inherently difficult task of independently and painstakingly delineating the contours of regime policy in a fractured polity like Nigeria, and the subjectivity that naturally underlay constructive discussions of purported discrimination undertaken by state or societal institutions, preceding analyses evaluated these three facets of government behavior mostly from the vantage points of the IYC, MASSOB and OPC. Nonetheless, to the extent possible, the previous chapter problematized group perceptions of inequity, authoritarianism, social and economic malaise, with the intention of better ascertaining their authentic underpinnings in relation to group militancy in Nigeria.

In general terms, the process of radicalization and corresponding state of radicalism in Nigeria commonly were outgrowths of a rational and concerted effort to achieve outlined aims. As such, the dependence on extremist devices was not simply or primarily an emotional, irrational, irascible or primordial response to the apparent or speculated ills plaguing society at any given point in time, even though group 'outbursts' attimeswere haphazard and disjointed. Organizational radicalization also was not an event that was finalized with the adoption of one or more militant tactics. Instead, it was a complicated process through which groups periodically refined their strategies, in light of changing internal and external developments.

The decision to utilize fanatical, as opposed to more mainstream, stratagems thereby was carefully weighed by the actors involved based on the

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The "Civil Society" Problematique: Deconstructing Civility and Southern Nigeria's Ethnic Radicalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Chapter I - Introduction 3
  • Chapter II - Overview of Study 13
  • Chapter III - Review of Literature 31
  • Chapter IV - Summary of Results-Ijaw Youth Council 59
  • Chapter V - Summary of Results-Movement for the Actualisation of the Sovereign State of Biafra (Massob) 87
  • Chapter VI - Summary of Results-Oodua Peoples Congress 109
  • Chapter VII - Analysis of Theoretical Anomalies and Regime Policy 135
  • Chapter VIII - Analysis of the Process of Radicalization 169
  • Chapter IX - Implications of Findings and Conclusion 207
  • Appendix A 221
  • Appendix B 227
  • Appendix C 233
  • Appendix D 235
  • Appendix E 237
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 315
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