The "Civil Society" Problematique: Deconstructing Civility and Southern Nigeria's Ethnic Radicalization

By Adedayo Oluwakayode Adekson | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER I

1
The Global South refers to countries outside Europe and North America, the West refers to countries in the latter two regions, while, except where otherwise noted, the North and South are used to distinguish the two main regions of Nigeria.
2
Also see Amin (1989) for a discussion of Eurocentrism as a codified system of knowledge that is underpinned by the West's history, material interests and quest for hegemony. The importance of evaluating Africans on their own terms, rather than as 'subjects' in the European narrative, is found in the works of Molefi Kete Asante and other Afrocentric scholars.
3
'[Such] evidence about the Orient or about any of its parts count for very little; what matters and is decisive is the Orientalist vision, a vision by no means confined to a professional scholar, but rather the common possession of all who have thought about the Orient in the West' (Said 1979, p.69). In this regard, Orientalism is a mythologized discourse, as it is 'self-containing [and] self-reinforcing', and not chiefly concerned with accuracy, rigour or evidence that may refute its supposedly sacrosanct assertions.
4
In order to retain this control over the 'developing' world, the West and some of its scholars (consciously or unconsciously) project themselves as the sole authority over existing 'reality' (as they perceive it) in that part of the world. Whilst this personal and historical authority appears to be all-encompassing, mysterious and natural, it actually is not. The flawed language employed by Orientalists, coupled with their vivid descriptions and imageries, reveal a reductionist, simplistic and subjective underpinning that cannot be denied or ignored, as words are employed not necessarily to inform or educate, but to subjugate or demonize the other, widen the chasm between the Orient and the Occident, as opposed to critically investigating and exposing hegemonic beliefs concerning the inherent superiority of the latter (and its history, culture, experiences and institutions), and the concomitant and assumed inferiority of the former.
5
In the American context, acrimonious debates surround divergent concerns like abortion, gun control, school prayer and the death penalty. More profoundly, the

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The "Civil Society" Problematique: Deconstructing Civility and Southern Nigeria's Ethnic Radicalization
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Chapter I - Introduction 3
  • Chapter II - Overview of Study 13
  • Chapter III - Review of Literature 31
  • Chapter IV - Summary of Results-Ijaw Youth Council 59
  • Chapter V - Summary of Results-Movement for the Actualisation of the Sovereign State of Biafra (Massob) 87
  • Chapter VI - Summary of Results-Oodua Peoples Congress 109
  • Chapter VII - Analysis of Theoretical Anomalies and Regime Policy 135
  • Chapter VIII - Analysis of the Process of Radicalization 169
  • Chapter IX - Implications of Findings and Conclusion 207
  • Appendix A 221
  • Appendix B 227
  • Appendix C 233
  • Appendix D 235
  • Appendix E 237
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 277
  • Index 315
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