1

Introduction

In the past, the man has been first; in the future, the system must be first.

(Frederick Winslow Taylor, The Principles of Scientific Management, 1911, p. 7)

Ergonomics is the study of the interaction between people and machines and the factors that affect the interaction. Its purpose is to improve the performance of systems by improving human machine interaction. This can be done by 'designing-in' a better interface or by 'designing-out' factors in the work environment, in the task or in the organisation of work that degrade human-machine performance. Systems can be improved by
• Designing the user-interface to make it more compatible with the task and the user. This makes it easier to use and more resistant to errors that people are known to make.
• Changing the work environment to make it safer and more appropriate for the task.
• Changing the task to make it more compatible with user characteristics.
• Changing the way work is organised to accommodate people's psychological, and social needs.

In an information processing task, we might redesign the interface so as to reduce the load on the user's memory (e.g. shift more of the memory load of the task onto the computer system or redesign the information to make it more distinctive and easier to recall). In a manual handling task, we might redesign the interface by adding handles or using lighter or smaller containers to reduce the load on the musculoskeletal system. Work environments can be improved by eliminating vibration and noise and providing better seating, desking, ventilation or lighting, for example. New tasks can be made easier to learn and to perform by designing them so that they resemble tasks or procedures that people are already familiar with. Work organisation can be improved by enabling workers to work at their own pace, so as to reduce the psychophysical stresses of being 'tied to the machine' or by introducing subsidiary tasks to increase the range of physical activity at work and provide contact with others.

The implementation of ergonomics in system design should make the system work better by eliminating aspects of system functioning that are undesireable, uncontrolled or unaccounted for, such as

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Ergonomics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 553

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.