Facing the Nazi Past: United Germany and the Legacy of the Third Reich

By Bill Niven | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

In the course of carrying out the research for this book, I corresponded with and visited many institutions and individuals in Germany, west and east. To all of these institutions and people I owe a debt of gratitude. Time and again requests for information were answered with enthusiastic interest in my project, and with a will to help which went far beyond my expectations. I would particularly like to thank the Institut für Sozialforschung in Hamburg, whose support and library proved invaluable. Without Dieter Schröder, member of that Institute, I would have taken much longer to trace material than I did take. The staff at the Gedenkstätte deutscher Widerstand in Berlin, at the concentration camp memorial sites at Buchenwald and Ravensbrück, and at the Federal Archives in Berlin all helped me in my seemingly endless search for material. Thanks to the many interviews I conducted and the letters I received in response to queries, I was able to acquire insights, and to identify new questions. For these interviews and letters, I would like to express my appreciation to Ignatz Bubis (a.d.), Gisela Gneist, Hannes Heer, Ekkehard Klausa, Wolfgang Oleschinski, Hubert Polus, Thomas Rahe, Maternus Schmitt, Horst Seferens, Dagmar and Ulrich Seidel, and Christian Ude. For advice on specific passages of the manuscript, I should like to thank Ruth Bettina Birn and Stuart Parkes. For reading through the manuscript and offering invaluable advice on how it might be improved or added to, I am grateful to Richard Evans, Barbara Fennell, Marianne Howarth, Jim Jordan, Hamish Ritchie and Stuart Taberner. Stuart's enquiries as to the progress of the manuscript were always a source of encouragement, and I very much appreciate Barbara's clear and helpful advice at both the beginning and the end of the project. My thanks go too to the British Academy for financing one of my research trips, and Marianne Howarth, Head of the German Section at my home institution, for her help in securing a teaching-free semester just when it mattered most. Last but not least, I would like to thank Heather McCallum and Victoria Peters, my editors at Routledge, for their support, assistance and patience.

Bill Niven
The Nottingham Trent University, 15 March 2001

-ix-

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Facing the Nazi Past: United Germany and the Legacy of the Third Reich
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates viii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Chronology 1933-2000 x
  • Why Now? - The Inclusive Picture 1
  • 1 - Concentration Camp Memorial Sites 10
  • 2 - The 'Double Past' 41
  • 3 - Resistance 62
  • 4 - 8 May 1945 in Political Discourse 95
  • 5 - Daniel Jonah Goldhagen and Victor Klemperer 119
  • 6 - The Crimes of the Wehrmacht 143
  • 7 - The Walser-Bubis Debate 175
  • 8 - The Holocaust Memorial 194
  • 9 - The Past in the Presen 233
  • Abbreviations 245
  • Bibliography 246
  • Index 257
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