The Emancipation Proclamation

By John Hope Franklin | Go to book overview

PROLOGUE
Time of Decision

PROMPTLY at noon on September 22, 1862, theCabinet was called to order by the President. Every member was present, despite the fact that the President had summoned them by special messenger only a few hours before. All were certain that Lincoln had an importantannouncement, but they bad to wait until he cleared the air of the tension and anxiety that he sensed. And he had his own way of doing it. Artemus Ward, the humorist, hadsent him a book of funny stories; and the President took this occasion to share with his heads of departments one of the funniest of all, "High-handed Outrage at Utica."

His inimitable reading of the American tall tale evoked reactions that ranged from the President's own hearty laugh to the solemn grimace by Stanton, the troubledand ever- serious Secretary of War. Some were genuinely amused, while others were merely courteous. All were doubtlesspreoccupied with speculations about what new statement of planning or policy their chief would now spring on them.

They did not have long to wait. Soon the reading was over and Lincoln put aside the book. His voicetook on a graver tone as he began to speak:

Gentlemen: I have, as you are aware, thought agreat deal about the relation of the war to Slavery; and you all remember that, several weeks ago, I read to you an Order I had prepared

-ix-

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The Emancipation Proclamation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue - Time of Decision ix
  • Chapter One - The Precedents and the Pressures 1
  • Chapter Two - The Decision and the Writing 31
  • Chapter Three - The Hundred Days 58
  • Chapter Four - Day of Days 94
  • Charter Five - Victory More Certain 136
  • Epilogue - End of Unrequited Toil 155
  • Sources 157
  • Notes 163
  • Index 175
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