Working for Mcdonald's in Europe: The Unequal Struggle?

By Tony Royle | Go to book overview

Appendix

Doing the research

The research began in September 1993 and set out to examine the activities of the McDonald's Corporation in Germany and the UK. This initial study was then extended 4 years later to examine the corporation's activities in thirteen European countries. These additional countries are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, The Netherlands, Ireland, Italy, Norway, Spain and Sweden. All in all, the study has spanned a period of just over 6 years. A variety of research methods were used in the study, including questionnaires and a period of observation while working in McDonald's restaurants in Germany and the UK. However, the bulk of the material has come from interviews. The interviews have included members of trade unions, of trade union federations, of international trade union organisations, of national and international employers' associations, of McDonald's senior management, of restaurant management, of franchise operators and a large number of employees, including works councillors and trade unions representatives in the restaurants.


Why undertake a comparative study?

There seems little doubt that the increasing internationalisation of business and the growth of multinational corporations and the growing importance of regional trade blocs such as the European Union require a better and more precise understanding of foreign institutions, cultures and business practices. Comparative studies allow us to be clearer about what is distinctive and intractable in international human resource management and international industrial relations, and hopefully provide us with a better understanding of the realities of management practices across national borders. This is important not only in terms of the pragmatic search for better management practices but also to understand the wider context of differing industrial relations systems in which management practices operate. Furthermore, we need to know much more about the implications of these practices for the lives of ordinary workers. This is something that, as yet, has received relatively little attention in many comparative studies. Multinational corporations are a natural focal point for these issues, increasingly operating beyond the reach of national governments yet affecting increasingly larger numbers of the

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Working for Mcdonald's in Europe: The Unequal Struggle?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables viii
  • 1 - Liberalism, Collectivism and the Multinational Corporation 1
  • 2 - Welcome to Big Mac 16
  • 3 - The Corporate Paradox 35
  • 4 - Mcdonald's at Work 56
  • 5 - 'there's No Place like Home' 85
  • 6 - Co-Determination? 119
  • 7 - For a Few Dollars More 150
  • 8 - Where's the Beef? 177
  • 9 - Conclusion 196
  • Appendix 215
  • Notes 223
  • References 226
  • Index 241
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