Working for Mcdonald's in Europe: The Unequal Struggle?

By Tony Royle | Go to book overview

Notes

1

Liberalism, collectivism and the multinational corporation

1
GATT, General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade; NAFTA, North American Free Trade Agreement.
2
Although this debate is prominent in Europe at the institutional level, it is also clear that the arguments are an important rallying point for academics, opposition parties and NGOs in any number of countries.
3
The distinction between political and economic liberalism is mirrored in the evolution of academic work articulating these two perspectives, e.g. see the work on political liberalism put forward by Rawls (1971).
4
'Think-tanks' include the Institute of Economic Affairs, the Centre for Policy Studies and the Adam Smith Institute and organisations such as the National Association for Freedom, Aims of Industry and the Society of Individualists. In addition, influential intellectual gatherings such as the Mont Pèlerin Society, founded by Hayek after the Second World War, were important in articulating and disseminating these ideas.
5
However, it should also be noted that in the USA Roosevelt's New Deal (Johnson, 1997) was also very much about the preservation of capital.
6
OECD, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development; a twenty-five-member club of industrialised nations.
7
The 'core standards' are (i) freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining; (ii) the elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labour; (iii) the effective abolition of child labour; and (iv) the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation (ILO, 1998:7).
8
The term social dialogue has been used in a number of ways, but here we use the term to describe the relationship between management and labour (the social partners) and the European Commission. These social dialogues have their legal base in the 1993 revision of the Treaty on European Union and can occur at both the interprofessional and the sectoral European level (Keller and Sörries, 1999).
9
It not within the scope of this book to examine these issues further. However, they are dealt with in detail in a number of other texts, e.g. Waters (1995).

4

McDonald's at work

1
Although, for those who are interested, it should be clear from this analysis that the epistemological position taken here is that culture is something an organisation 'is' not 'has'.

-223-

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Working for Mcdonald's in Europe: The Unequal Struggle?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables viii
  • 1 - Liberalism, Collectivism and the Multinational Corporation 1
  • 2 - Welcome to Big Mac 16
  • 3 - The Corporate Paradox 35
  • 4 - Mcdonald's at Work 56
  • 5 - 'there's No Place like Home' 85
  • 6 - Co-Determination? 119
  • 7 - For a Few Dollars More 150
  • 8 - Where's the Beef? 177
  • 9 - Conclusion 196
  • Appendix 215
  • Notes 223
  • References 226
  • Index 241
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