The Singularity of Literature

By Derek Attridge | Go to book overview

6

Reading and responding

Creative reading

Otherness may be brought into the world, through the event of creation, in a number of fields: in writing, in scientific, mathematical, or philosophical thought, in political practice, and in painting or musical composition, to name just a few possibilities. It may also emerge, as I have already suggested, in responses to singular inventions in all of these fields. Among these responses is reading. It is only through the accumulation of individual acts of reading and responding, in fact, that large cultural shifts occur, as the inventiveness of a particular work is registered by more and more participants in a particular field.

Reading (and I include here listening to an utterance or mentally rehearsing a work known by heart) involves a number of different types of activity occurring simultaneously and not always in accord with one another. For purposes of analysis, we may isolate from these a basic reading procedure consisting of the mechanical conversion of typographic marks or phonetic sequences into conceptual structures, following the conventions of lexicography, syntax, genre, implicature, relevance, and so on. At the same time as it tries to decode the textual string with the necessary objectivity and accuracy, however, reading-and I am referring here to the reading of all kinds of text, not only those traditionally classified as literary-can be an attempt to respond to the otherness, inventiveness, and singularity of the work (three properties which, as we have seen, are closely inter-implicated). When it succeeds in apprehending otherness, in registering the singularity and inventiveness of the work, we may call a reading creative, by analogy with the other types of creativity noted earlier. 1

READING AND RESPONDING

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Singularity of Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Introductory 1
  • 2 - Creation and the Other 17
  • 3 - Originality and Invention 35
  • 4 - Inventive Language and the Literary Event 55
  • 5 - Singularity 63
  • 6 - Reading and Responding 79
  • 7 - Performance 95
  • 8 - Form, Meaning, Context 107
  • 9 - Responsibility and Ethics 123
  • 10 - An Everyday Impossibility 133
  • Appendix: Debts and Directions 139
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 173
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 178

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.