As Others See Us: Body Movement and the Art of Successful Communication

By Ellen Goldman | Go to book overview

EIGHT

GETTING TO WORK

The movement qualities around friendship resemble a well-rehearsed dance, with its rhythmic regularity and synchrony of timing. Satisfying as this is, this quality is not essential for a productive working relationship, since it is possible to use postures, gestures and Integrated Movements effectively without this common unifying flow.

For instance, in a work setting we are more attentive to the outcome and product of communication than to the process, the feelings and moods. Business people can harmonize their postures, gestures and Integrated Movements to compliment their associate's and move a task forward even without personal affinity or a flowing mutuality. In other words, movement can create an environment to support the successful implementation of a task. Business associates may share a goal which they maintain in their posture, while keeping a distance through gestures and yet be open to suggestions or ideas expressed through Integrated Movement. A team like this would feel confident working together.

Complimentary strengths and differences in style are useful in collaborations, whereas similarity of personality, usually the basis of friendship, can be disastrous as working relationships. Friendship is a source of personal rejuvenation, where we let our hair down, "spill the beans," where we feel comfortable enough to present ourselves at our worst and be reminded of our best. But this freedom can strain a good working relationship where the goal is to accomplish a task. When mixing the two, we want to pay careful attention to boundaries and needs. The focus on Integrated Movement helps maintain the boundaries and definition of a good working relationship.

"A friend offered to cater a seminar I had organized. She arrived late one day. As we prepared, I said, 'It's okay that you were late today, but there are days

-93-

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As Others See Us: Body Movement and the Art of Successful Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgement vi
  • Contents vii
  • Prologue xv
  • One - Perceiving Movement 1
  • Two - Looking at Movement: Gestures and Postures 5
  • Three - Integrated Movement: the Moment of Truth 23
  • Four - Experiencing Integrated Movement 33
  • Five - Friendship 51
  • Six - Relationships 63
  • Seven - Family 81
  • Eight - Getting to Work 93
  • Nine - The Body 115
  • Ten - The Art of Life 147
  • Eleven - Reflections 169
  • Epilogue: - Our Quantum Leap 173
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 187
  • Further Readings in Non-Verbal Communication 193
  • Index 197
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