Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials

By Nathan C. Leites; Elsa Bernaut | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7 Reunion with the Party

The defendant's compliance during his trial had the double purpose of giving to the Party what was its due and of reuniting him with the Party, abolishing an intolerable isolation.

Such compliance completed and proved the oppositionist's capitulation. As Grinko said in his last plea:

"In the situation in which I found myself there was only one way open to me to prove by my deeds that I have repented, and that was to disclose all the facts of the conspiracy . . . known to me. . . . I have done this to the end."1

For some defendants the emphasis was on capitulation. Thus Bukharin (partly resisting) said in his last plea:

"The confession of the accused is not essential. The confession of the accused is a medieval principle of jurisprudence. But here we also have the internal demolition of the forces of counter-revolution."2

For other defendants, public compliance itself contributed to the undoing of their oppositional past. In his last plea, Piatakov insisted:

". . . I cannot agree, I cannot reconcile myself to the assertion made by the State Prosecutor, namely, that even now I remain a Trotskyite. . . . the sole motive, the only motive, that prompted me to make the statements that I have made, was the desire . . . to get rid of my . . . Trotskyite past."3

Piatakov also seemed to feel more specifically that a major reason for confession was to induce others--and through them himself--to believe in the genuineness of his capitulation. He said, continuing the passage just quoted:

"Citizens Judges. . . .

". . . do not deprive me of the right to feel . . . that even though too late I have nevertheless shaken off this filth, this vileness.

". . . here I stand before you in filth . . . bereft of everything through my own fault, a man who has lost his Party . . . who has lost his very self.

". . . Do not deprive me of the right to feel that in your eyes, too, I have found strength in myself, albeit too late, to break with my criminal past."4

Presumably Piatakov had two feelings about this terminal situation. One was that he could not shake off the "filth" which had affected his very core; the other, that his trial behavior had achieved precisely this result and

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.