Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials

By Nathan C. Leites; Elsa Bernaut | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18 The Moderation of Means

In the preceding chapter we largely discussed the occasions on which the defendants alleged that they had used extreme means but refused to allege that their intentions had been improper. We shall now consider the occasions on which the defendants resisted both these charges, stressing that they did not commit the extreme acts with which they were charged.

Bukharin's testimony most nearly approximated a general denial of the use of extreme means, as contrasted with, say, support of the Ryutin platform of 1932 which advocated organized opposition to induce the Party to remove the Stalin group from leadership. In his last plea Bukharin alluded to this:

". . . I regard myself politically responsible for the sum total of the crimes committed by the bloc of Rights and Trotskyites. . . .

". . . Nevertheless I consider that I have the right to refute certain charges. . . ."1

He made use of this "right" when the Uzbek leader, Ikramov, alleged that in 1933 Bukharin "set us [the Uzbek conspirators] a number of tasks. The first--wrecking activities, the second--kulak insurrection. . . . Further, he said, that the program of the Rights included the point about terrorism. . . . With regard to terrorism he set us no immediate tasks. Then he pointed out that it would be absolutely necessary to engage in diversionist, destructive activities."2 Vishinsky questioned Bukharin about his conversation; Bukharin admitted that it had taken place and that they "discussed political subjects.":

VISHINSKY: Is Ikramov presenting them correctly?

BUKHARIN: In substance I spoke to him along the lines of the Ryutin platform [ Ikramov had said that Bukharin "cited the theses which two months later became known as the Ryutin platform."].

VISHINSKY: So, in substance he is presenting it correctly.

BUKHARIN: That depends on which you consider the substance. . . .

VISHINSKY: . . . did you speak to him about the methods which should be applied in . . . [the!] struggle [against the Soviet government]?

BUKHARIN: About the methods which were included in the Ryutin platform. It . . . contained a vague allusion to terrorism.

VISHINSKY: Did you talk to him about wrecking activities as well?

BUKHARIN: No, I did not. . . .

VISHINSKY: . . . Did you talk to Ikramov about wrecking activities and acts of diversion in subsequent years?

BUKHARIN: No, I did not.3

-269-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.