Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials

By Nathan C. Leites; Elsa Bernaut | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 20 Pretended Forgetting and Ignorance

By pretending loss or uncertainty of memory about some alleged major event (or about an alleged event very close to himself), a defendant could convey--particularly in view of the high Bolshevik valuation of memory-- that it had not occurred:

VISHENSKY: . . . Accused Rykov . . . when did your underground . . . activities . . . begin?

RYKOV: Essentially, they began in 1928.

VISHINSKY: Did they assume shape in 1928?

RYKOV: Perhaps; it is difficult to remember.1

Rykov discussed Bukharin's apprehension that "Napoleonism" would develop from the alleged intention of the Tukhachevsky group to "open the front" to the Germans in case of war:

VISHENSKY: And whom did you suspect of this Napoleonism?

RYKOV: I do not remember. The question was discussed in general terms. The leader of the military group was Tukhachevsky. I cannot say whether his name was mentioned or not.2

Rykov also told about the information he had received about Karakhan's negotiations with the German government:

RYKOV: Tomsky informed us that the Germans had told Karakhan that . . . [they] insisted on the national republics being given the right of secession. We . . . understood . . . it as meaning the dismemberment of the USSR.

VISHINSKY: That is to say, as meaning the surrender of Byelorussia?

RYKOV: And thereupon, as far as I remember (and one must not and cannot forget such things), we accepted it in this general form.3

Bukharin repeatedly insisted, against the objections of Vishinsky and the President, that he wanted to speak in detail about the ideological development of the oppositions. In doing so he said:

"I think that the Ryutin platform . . . as far as I can remember during the trial, the platform of the Right . . . organization, was perhaps already [in 1932] actually a common platform of the other groupings, including the Kamenev- Zinoviev and Trotskyite groupings."4

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.