Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials

By Nathan C. Leites; Elsa Bernaut | Go to book overview

Postscript on Beria

On December 17, 1953, Moscow announced the criminal indictment of L. P. Beria and six high police officials. Three of the defendants ( V. G. Dekanozov, B. Z. Kobulov, S. A. Goglidze) had occupied positions both in Georgia and at the center, while three others ( V. N. Merkulov, P. Y. Meshik, L. E. Vlodzimirsky) were described only by their Moscow past. The defendants thus form a homogeneous group, in contrast to the "amalgams" of all previous trials studied above. The announcement said that the seven would be tried at a special session of the Supreme Court of the USSR in accordance with the law issued on the day of Kirov's murder, December 1, 1934, which provided for a procedure in camera.

On December 24, 1953, Moscow released a statement concerning the alleged trial (December 18-23) of the seven. This statement described the court as being composed of two military figures ( Marshal I. S. Konev, the President, and General K. S. Moskalenko), two high Party figures ( N. M. Shvernik and N. A. Mikhailov), one high policy official ( K. F. Lunev), one high Georgian official ( M. I. Kuchava), and two judges ( E. L. Zeidin and L. A. Gromov). According to the indictment, all of the defendants had, in the preliminary investigation, "admitted their guilt in committing a series of most serious crimes against the state." And according to the verdict

"The defendants confirmed on trial the confessions which they had made in the preliminary investigation and admitted their guilt in committing a series of most serious crimes."

All the defendants were condemned to death, without the right of appeal. According to a second communiqué, the judgment was executed on December 23, the day of the verdict.

The liquidation of the Beria group adds another variant of Bolshevik trials of Bolshevik leaders to those already mentioned in this study (cf. pp. 381- 382). All of the trials we have analyzed were public, with the exception of the Prague trial of November, 1952, which was secret but recorded; and many, though not all, of the words spoken at that trial were subsequently played over the radio. We have also noted certain alleged trials--such as that of Yenukidze and others--for which no proceedings were disclosed and whose published indictments and verdicts were brief. In the case of the Beria group,

-393-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ritual of Liquidation: The Case of the Moscow Trials
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.