Depression: The Way out of Your Prison

By Dorothy Rowe | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

THE DEPRESSION STORY

We all love stories-telling stories and listening to stories. When we watch a film, or go to a play, or read a novel we might not already know the actual story told in that film, play or novel, but we already know the plot or theme of the story. There are a great many different stories but very few plots. The two most common plots are the love story plot and the good triumphing over evil plot. The love story plot is that of two people meeting, falling in love, and having some misunderstanding or encountering some adversity. The ending may be that of living happily ever after or that of a tragic separation. The love story plot can be part of the most popular of all plots, that of good triumphing over evil. In real life evil quite often triumphs over good, but stories with such a plot rarely get told in films, plays and novels. We all like happy endings, and, if the ending cannot be happy, we need an ending which assures us that, one way or another, good will at last triumph.

Not all stories get turned into a film, play or novel. We each have our own story, our life story, and all these life stories have a simple plot-we are born, we live, we die. However, within this main plot there are many sub-plots, and here I want to tell you about a plot which I call The Depression Story.

Everyone who gets depressed has his or her own individual story about becoming and being depressed, yet all of these stories have the same basic plot. I have mentioned all the elements of this plot in the preceding chapter, but now I shall put them together in the order they occur.

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Depression: The Way out of Your Prison
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Preface to the Second Edition ix
  • Preface to the Third Edition x
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • Chapter 1 - The Prison 1
  • Chapter 2 - Inside the Prison 4
  • Chapter 3 - How to Build Your Prison 12
  • Chapter 4 - The Depression Story 101
  • Chapter 5 - Why Not Leave the Prison? 114
  • Chapter 6 - Why I Won't Leave the Prison 119
  • Chapter 7 - Outside the Wall: Living with a Depressed Person 162
  • Chapter 8 - Suppose I Did Want to Leave the Prison, What Should I Do? 208
  • Chapter 9 - Leaving the Prison 292
  • Chapter 10 - The Prison Vanishes 301
  • Notes 305
  • Index 317
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