Secrets of Screen Acting

By Patrick Tucker; John Stamp | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

SCREEN VERSUS STAGE

We are all stage actors

Oh yes we are. You may not actually have walked the boards to perform (at least not since school), but every time we want to get our way by putting on an "act," we are "acting," and because it is for someone at a reasonable distance away from us-a "real" distance-it is stage acting.

The child wanting her own way who cries real tears, which are miraculously cleared when she gets it, is giving a particularly convincing "performance."

The stern authoritarian voice you put on when complaining about bad service in a shop is another.

The fawning words and actions we all go through when pulled over for speeding, and the subsequent fake smiles, comprise yet another performance aimed at a particular audience.

These are moments when we are using our words and bodies to convince someone of some emotion or thought that may not, in fact, be the literal truth of what we are feeling, but is the emotion we want the other person to believe we are experiencing. This is what stage actors do, too.

Very few of us-especially, funnily enough, screen directors-have experience in acting for the screen or know what the difference would be between this and the acting mentioned above.

-3-

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Secrets of Screen Acting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to Second Edition ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Screen Versus Stage 3
  • Chapter 2 - Film Versus Television 19
  • Chapter 3 - The Frame 31
  • Chapter 4 - The Camera 43
  • Chapter 5 - Reactions and Business 55
  • Chapter 6 - Sound and Vocal Levels 69
  • Chapter 7 - Typecasting 83
  • Chapter 8 - Acting 99
  • Chapter 9 - Auditions 113
  • Chapter 10 - Rehearsals and Technicals 129
  • Chapter 11 - Directing Actors for the Screen 139
  • Chapter 12 - Announcers (And the Art of Being Interviewed) 149
  • Chapter 13 - The Shoot 155
  • Chapter 14 - The Editor and Editing 173
  • Epilogue 181
  • Acting Exercises 189
  • Bibliography 201
  • Biographies 205
  • Glossary 209
  • Index 237
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