Secrets of Screen Acting

By Patrick Tucker; John Stamp | Go to book overview

Chapter 8

ACTING

You have to be a bit worried by now that I seem to have addressed a whole lot of technical problems, but have not dealt with the central issue of "acting."

This is not accidental, even though the book is called Secrets of Screen Acting. But before we get into acting, we have to discuss what good acting really is.

I acted as a student in England and trained at a Method drama department in the U.S. Since then I have directed theater and television productions in the U.K. and the U.S. as well as Australia, Canada, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Jordan, Kenya, South Africa, and South Korea. Since 1975 I have been training and teaching actors on both sides of the Atlantic. I have had access to, and knowledge of, a wide variety of acting and acting styles.

The result is that I find it impossible to define what a good actor should "do" in order to give a fine performance. I have known actors who believe and feel everything and who give stunning performances. I have known those who equally believe and feel everything who give rotten performances. I have come across those who have no idea what they are doing, who wow the critics and audiences with the truth of their acting-and, of course, the reverse, where the lack of belief and truth shows up only too well.

The one link I find is quite simply-whatever works. Some while back in the U.K. we were privileged to have working on stage and screen three

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Secrets of Screen Acting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to Second Edition ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Screen Versus Stage 3
  • Chapter 2 - Film Versus Television 19
  • Chapter 3 - The Frame 31
  • Chapter 4 - The Camera 43
  • Chapter 5 - Reactions and Business 55
  • Chapter 6 - Sound and Vocal Levels 69
  • Chapter 7 - Typecasting 83
  • Chapter 8 - Acting 99
  • Chapter 9 - Auditions 113
  • Chapter 10 - Rehearsals and Technicals 129
  • Chapter 11 - Directing Actors for the Screen 139
  • Chapter 12 - Announcers (And the Art of Being Interviewed) 149
  • Chapter 13 - The Shoot 155
  • Chapter 14 - The Editor and Editing 173
  • Epilogue 181
  • Acting Exercises 189
  • Bibliography 201
  • Biographies 205
  • Glossary 209
  • Index 237
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