Secrets of Screen Acting

By Patrick Tucker; John Stamp | Go to book overview

Epilogue

A good workman has a good box of tools and knows how to use every one. An expert workman also knows which tool to use when. Everything in the toolbox is not used on every job at every moment.

In this book I have tried to teach you the whys and wherefores of different techniques for the screen. Not all of them will be of use to all of you all the time, but they should give you a better range of choices to make when faced with differing problems of acting in front of the camera.

A great deal of professional acting nowadays means working on the screen, yet those connected with training are mostly past and current stage performers. Even those who have screen experience often have only had it in front of the camera, but they do not always know what goes on behind the scenes that influences what goes onto the screen itself.

It is wonderful to have a strong belief about styles of acting. It becomes wrong, however, when it is religious in its intensity, and the belief grows that there is only one true faith. Just as many find different ways to worship, so there are different ways to act.

When you started to drive a stick shift car, you wondered how on earth it was possible to talk and change gears at the same time. It all seemed very difficult, and yet soon you were chatting away, weaving in and out of traffic. Changing gears has become so automatic you barely notice or think about it.

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Secrets of Screen Acting
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to Second Edition ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Screen Versus Stage 3
  • Chapter 2 - Film Versus Television 19
  • Chapter 3 - The Frame 31
  • Chapter 4 - The Camera 43
  • Chapter 5 - Reactions and Business 55
  • Chapter 6 - Sound and Vocal Levels 69
  • Chapter 7 - Typecasting 83
  • Chapter 8 - Acting 99
  • Chapter 9 - Auditions 113
  • Chapter 10 - Rehearsals and Technicals 129
  • Chapter 11 - Directing Actors for the Screen 139
  • Chapter 12 - Announcers (And the Art of Being Interviewed) 149
  • Chapter 13 - The Shoot 155
  • Chapter 14 - The Editor and Editing 173
  • Epilogue 181
  • Acting Exercises 189
  • Bibliography 201
  • Biographies 205
  • Glossary 209
  • Index 237
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