A Theory of Ecological Justice

By Brian Baxter | Go to book overview

9

Ecological justice and the non-sentient
The position which we have now reached is as follows. We began by seeking to vindicate a universal approach to moral theory as against the contextualism which has become popular among some proponents of environmental ethics. This was necessary in order to permit the possible development of a moral theory of the relations between human beings and the non-human beings with which we share the planet which, if valid, would be meaningfully addressable to all moral agents, whatever their cultural context. We then spent time attempting to defend the view that non-human organisms are all morally considerable. Specifically, we aimed to show that there is no good reason to exclude the class of non-sentient organisms from that category. We endeavoured to defend the reasonableness of a theory of differential moral weight as applied to various kinds of organism. We then argued that our moral responsibilities towards non-human organisms are not simply those of humaneness, but encompass requirements of distributive justice, in spite of what appear to be insurmountable objections to the idea that beings which are solely moral patients can be proper recipients of such justice. We then examined some eminent theories of distributive justice with respect to the purely human case to ascertain whether any of them could accommodate the idea of distributive justice towards the non-human. Two candidates proved to be incompatible with such a notion. However, latterly we sought to show that the liberal theory of justice which has emerged from the Rawlsian matrix is capable of encompassing justice towards the non-human and of justifying some constitutional provisions to secure the claims of the non-human to their fair share of environmental resources.In the remaining chapters we turn to the difficult issue of trying to specify what distributive justice towards other organisms involves. This will require us to formulate and justify some specific claims with respect to such theoretical issues as:
1 Which entities are the bearers of the claims in justice to environmental resources?
2 To what resources may they properly lay claim in the name of justice?
3 How are moral agents who seek to meet the proper claims to resources of different claimants to adjudicate disputes between them?

We will also need to say something reasonably specific about the institutional arrangements that will be required within and between human societies for the

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Theory of Ecological Justice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 207

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.