A Theory of Ecological Justice

By Brian Baxter | Go to book overview

Notes

2

The case for social constructivism considered

1
See Gare 1995 for an excellent discussion of postmodernism in its relation to environmental problems.
2
All the quotations in this paragraph are from a personal communication.
3
This is roughly what Walzer characterizes immanentism to be in ethics (Walzer 1983).

4

The restriction of moral status to sentient organisms

1
Singer 1993: chapter 3 is the source of this argument.

5

The moral status of the non-sentient

1
In a personal communication.
2
In a personal communication.

6

The concept of ecological justice: objections and replies

1
In a personal communication addressing an earlier draft of these arguments.
2
I am grateful to Andy Dobson for urging me to consider the idea that issues of ecological justice may be resolvable purely on the basis of considering what each (kind of) organism contributes to the total of environmental benefits. As will be apparent, it is not a view which I am able to accept, but it is an important possibility which merits careful consideration.
3
As Marcel Wissenburg has pointed out to me, Rawls in his Political Liberalism allows that his principles of justice can be overruled in certain circumstances - by the 'general conception of justice' in poorer societies, and by principles for a decent but non-democratic society. However, the Rawlsian principles are not overturnable in a 'well-ordered' society, whereas there are no circumstances where the rights of non-person organisms may not properly be overridden.

7

Liberal theories of justice and the non-human

1
However, as noted earlier, Hailwood wants to encompass non-biotic nature in the 'otherness' view, and thus wants the 'respect' he enjoins to apply to entities which cannot have any interests. Arguably, whatever this respect amounts to it is going to be rather problematic to regard it as moral respect, rather than, say, aesthetic.

8

Ecological justice and justice as impartiality

1
From a personal communication.

-195-

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