A Theory of Ecological Justice

By Brian Baxter | Go to book overview

Index

a
agenda setting 179 -80;
see also international environmental institutions
aims of text 8 - 10
Anarchy, State and Utopia (Nozick, R.) 90
Antarctic Treaty 159
Aristotelian theory of dialectic 67 ;
see also moral status
Attenborough, Sir D. 1
Attfield, R. 51 -4

b
Barry, B. see theory of justice asimpartiality (Barry, B.)
basic interests of species 135 -6, 150
Baxter, B., autobiographical notes 191 -4
Bell, D., liberal ecologism 97 - 101 , 108
biodiversity:
projects 14 ;
protection 3
Bookchin, M. 157 -8
Brundtland Report (sustainable development) 4;
see also sustainable development

c
Carter, A. 158
circumstances of justice 81 ;
see also justice
CITES 159 , 182
clashes of interest between organisms 150 , 170
Clements, F. E. 164
CMS 182
community of justice:
admission of great apes 144 -7;
inclusion of non-humanorganisms 86 -8, 114 , 119 -25;
inclusion of non-rational human beings 46 , 51 , 77 -8, 116 -19;
primary group within 115 -18
conservation management 163 ;
ecological research 164 -5;
ecological theory 164 ;
education 168 -9;
manager skills 165 ;
role of government 169 -70;
role of media 168 ;
role of stake holders 166 -8
constitutional support for ecological justice 112 -13, 155 -6, 183 , 190 ;
Germany 101 , 161
Convention concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (Paris Convention) 182
Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) 5 , 131 , 173 -4, 180 -2
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna (CITES) 159 , 182
Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) 182
Convention on Wetlands of International Importance, especially as Waterfowl Habitat (Ramsar Convention) 182
culturally-constructed contexts:
difficulty in determining relevant culture 17 ;
importance of 14 - 16

d
Declaration on Great Apes141 -2;
see also Great Apes Survival Project (GRASP)
DeGrazia, D. 40 -1;
arguments against according moral status to non-humans 46 -8;
moral considerability of non-sentient organisms 50 -4, 58 -9;
moral considerability of sentient organisms 45 ;
principle of equal consideration 45 -6, 71 -2
discourse theory (Habermas, J.) 67 ;
use of in developing theory of ecological justice 68

-202-

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