The Horrors of the Half-Known Life: Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America

By G. J. Barker-Benfield | Go to book overview

The Horrors of theHalf-Known Life

Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America

G.J.BARKER-BENFIELD

Routledge

New York and London

-iii-

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The Horrors of the Half-Known Life: Male Attitudes toward Women and Sexuality in Nineteenth-Century America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xi
  • Introduction to the First Edition liii
  • Part I - The Sexes in Tocqueville's America 1
  • 1 - The American Man 3
  • 2 - The Arena 8
  • 3 - Work and Sex 19
  • 4 - Democratic Fathers and Democratic Sons 23
  • 5 - Freedom of Intercourse 37
  • 6 - Strong Men Over Orderly Women 45
  • Part II - From Midwives to Gynecologists 59
  • 7 - The Absence of Midwives from America 61
  • 8 - Democratic Doctors 72
  • 9 - The Rise of Gynecology 80
  • 10 - Architect of the Vagina 91
  • 11 - Sexual Surgery 120
  • Part III - The Lightning-Rod Man 133
  • 12 - The Reverend John Todd 135
  • 13 - Primers for Anxiety 155
  • 14 - Todd's Masturbation Phobia 163
  • 15 - The Spermatic Economy and Proto-Sublimation 175
  • 16 - Men Earn-Women Spend 189
  • 17 - Woman's Refinement 197
  • 18 - Sex and Anarchy 203
  • 19 - From Mother to Mother Earth 215
  • Part IV - Augustus Kinsley Gardner 227
  • 20 - Dr. Gardner's Education 229
  • 21 - Gardner's Career 244
  • 22 - The Physical Decline of American Women 256
  • 23 - Punishing Women 275
  • 24 - The Great Organ of Communication 295
  • Notes to Chapters 309
  • Index 339
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