Sir George Goldie and the Making of Nigeria

By John E. Flint; Gerald S. Graham | Go to book overview

6
German Opposition--and a Setback

THE strongest guarantees against monopoly on the Niger were contained in the international agreements which Britain had concluded with the powers of Europe, particularly with Germany. Germany had held a peculiarly dominant position at the conference which had resulted in the Berlin Act of 1885, and the limitations incurred in that instrument had been further reinforced in detail by the Anglo-German Agreement of April- June 1885.1

The way in which Goldie escaped from these obligations forms in itself a fascinating study of political manoeuvre; it provided his apprenticeship to the art of private diplomacy in which he was to excel in later years. The Niger Clauses of the Berlin Act were so simply overcome that it may even be possible that Goldie, who was present at their drafting by the British delegation, wrote them himself. Soon after the signature of the Act Goldie made known his interpretation of it, which thereafter he held to tenaciously. The Act made no mention of 'trade' on the Niger; it referred only to 'navigation'. Navigation, argued Goldie, simply meant moving on water. This all ships were free to do, without hindrance. But let them once touch the banks of the river, they then ceased to be pure navigators; they had entered the company's territories and must submit to its laws and pay its taxes. 'Navigation', on Goldie's definition, thus amounted merely to transit; only vessels sailing through the

____________________
1
For detail of both these instruments see Chap. 4, pp. 69 and 74-5.

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sir George Goldie and the Making of Nigeria
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.